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New Jersey State of Mind

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Friday, July 06, 2007

We're in a New Jersey state of mind. On today's show: three writers and guest host Julie Burstein (all native New Jersey-ites) try to make sense of their home state's mixed reputation. We'll also find out why the construction of New Jersey's Pulaski Skyway caused a major political power struggle in the early 20th century. Then, a comic novel that follows three high school students through the college application process, from SATs the rejection letters. And today's Please Explain is all about smell.

Writing About New Jersey

New Jersey is the Garden State, but it's also known for its highways and chemical plants. Young writers from New Jersey make sense of their home state's mixed reputation in a new collection called Living on the Edge of the World: New Jersey Writers Take On the Garden State. Contributors ...

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America's First Superhighway

New Jersey's Pulaski Skyway was the country's first superhighway, designed to connect the hub of New York City to the rest of the USA. The construction project was very contentious, and resulted in a very flawed highway. The Skyway hasn't changed much since it first opened in 1932. Steven Hart's ...

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Getting In

Susan Coll's new comic novel, Acceptance, tracks three high school students as they go through the college admissions process...from SATs, campus tours, and interviews to rejection letters.

Acceptance is available for purchase at amazon.com

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Please Explain: Smell

On today's Please Explain, we get nosey with smell. Biophysicist Dr. Luca Turin and psychobiologist Dr. Charles Wysocki explain what odors are, how our noses work, and what kind of information humans can gather by smell.

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