Streams

Complicated Relationships

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Tuesday, May 29, 2007

Dina Matos McGreevey speaks out about her marriage to former New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey. Then, CBS correspondent Bill Geist tells us about some of the unique characters he met on his recent cross-country odyssey. And we hear about a new novel about a Holocaust survivor and his only daughter. Plus, we look at how cigarettes have shaped American history since the late 1800s.

Guests:

Dina Matos McGreevey

Dina Matos McGreevey Talks About Her Marriage

In 2004, James McGreevey resigned as New Jersey's Governor and announced that he was a “gay American.” In Silent Partner, Dina Matos McGreevey talks about their marriage and describes how his very public outing changed her life.

Silent Partner is available for purchase at amazon.com

Events: Dina Matos ...

Comments [3]

Way Off the Road

CBS correspondent Bill Geist tells us about some of the eccentric Americans he met in his recent cross-country trek.

Way Off the Road is available for purchase at amazon.com

Events: Bill Geist will be reading
as part of the Bryant Park Word for Word Series
Wednesday, ...

Comments [1]

The Border of Truth

In The Border of Truth, Victoria Redel imagines the complicated relationship between a Holocaust survivor and his only daughter.

The Border of Truth is available for purchase at amazon.com

Events: Victoria Redel will be reading and signing books
Monday, June 18 at 7 pm
McNally Robinson ...

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The Cigarette Century

Allan Brandt examines the tobacco industry, and how it's shaped American history since cigarettes began being mass-produced in the late 1800s.

The Cigarette Century is available for purchase at amazon.com

Comments [3]

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