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Understanding All the Elements

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Friday, May 25, 2007

Vanity Fair’s David Rose questions the guilt of a man convicted of a series of rapes and murders in Columbus, Georgia in the 1970s. Then, we turn our attention to the development of plutonium in the middle of the 20th century. Later on, we learn about the Melungeons--a group that lives in isolated areas of Appalachia. Plus, a butcher and a farmer answer your questions about meat on Please Explain.

Guests:

David Rose

The Stocking Stranglings and Southern Justice

In the 1970s, a serial rapist and murderer strangled seven elderly white women in Columbus, Georgia. In The Big Eddy Club, Vanity Fair’s David Rose explains why he suspects the wrong man is on death row for the crimes.

The Big Eddy Club is available for purchase at

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The World's Most Dangerous Element

Former New Yorker staff writer Jeremy Bernstein examines the development of plutonium, and explains how the search for a new element resulted in a nuclear arms race, and the bombing of Nagasaki.

Plutonium is available for purchase at amazon.com

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Kinfolks

Lisa Alther talks about her fascination with the Melungeons--a group of Southerners with racially mixed heritage who live in isolated areas of Appalachia. After learning more about them, Lisa Alther discovers she may have Melungeons in her own family.

Kinfolks is available for purchase at amazon.com

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Please Explain: Meat

On today’s Please Explain, a butcher and a farmer answer your questions about meat. Stanley Lobel is a fourth generation butcher, who owns and operates Lobel's with his sons and nephew. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall runs a 60-acre farm in Devon, England, and is the author of The River Cottage ...

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