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Baseball Crazy

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Wednesday, April 04, 2007

Baseball star Gary Sheffield's 18 years of hard work in the majors has paid off - the Detroit Tigers signed him to a three-year, $41-million contract this winter. He joins Leonard today to talk about the business of baseball. Also: why 1908 was a crazy year for baseball. Then, Grandmother Agnes Pilgrim, who's the oldest surviving female member of the Rogue River Indians. And we'll hear an update on the horrific wave of murders in Juarez, Mexico. Over 400 women and girls have been killed, and still no one knows who's responsible.

Inside Baseball With Gary Sheffield

Baseball superstar Gary Sheffield has been a Brewer, Padre, Marlin, Dodger, Brave, Yankee...and now he's a Tiger. Sheffield explains why so many baseball players team-hop these days. His new book is Inside Power.

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Baseball Was Crazy in 1908

Modern baseball was created in 1908. Journalist and former Little League infielder Cait Murphy tells us what baseball was like in the early days, with its grand cast of characters like John McGraw, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, and others. She’s the author of a new book called Crazy ‘08.

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Grandmother Agnes Pilgrim

Agnes Pilgrim the oldest living female member of the Rogue River Indians of southern Oregon. She is one of the 13 indigenous elders on the Grandmothers Council. Their project is the subject of an upcoming documentary, For the Next 7 Generations: The Grandmothers Speak. ...

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Unsolved Murders in Juarez

Since 1993, over 400 women and girls have been brutally murdered just across the US border in Juarez, Mexico. No one knows who’s responsible, and despite numerous arrests, the murders continue. Teresa Rodriguez, author of Daughters of Juarez, is co- host and correspondent for Univision’s prime-time award-wining newsmagazine program "Aquí ...

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