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Survival of the Kurds

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Tuesday, April 03, 2007

Hundreds of thousands of Kurds were killed in Saddam Hussein's Iraq. A Kurdish woman from Baghdad talks about her determination to survive. Also: a new play that explores the impact of 9/11 and the war in Iraq on the lives of three individuals. Then, a novel about the discovery of a lost manuscript by Herman Melville. And we look into whether Pakistan bears much of the blame for the resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan.

How Pakistan is Helping the Taliban

Journalist and businesswoman Sarah Chayes says that Pakistan is largely to blame for the reemergence of the Taliban in Afghanistan – and that the Bush administration has been far too gentle with Pakistan. Her recent article, "Days of Lies and Roses," is in the Boston Review.

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Dying City

Dying City, now at Lincoln Center, is set in a downtown Manhattan apartment. The play looks at how 9/11 and the war in Iraq transform the lives of 3 characters. Leonard talks to playwright Christopher Shinn and actor Pablo Schreiber.

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Herman Melville's Lost Manuscript

Sheridan Hay’s debut novel, The Secret of Lost Things, imagines what happens when an 18-year old discovers a lost manuscript by Herman Melville.

Events: Sheridan Hay will be speaking and signing books
Wednesday, April 4 at 7 pm
Upper West Side Barnes & Noble
2289 ...

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A Kurdish Woman's Struggle to Survive

Hundreds of thousands of Joanna Al-Askari Hussain’s fellow Kurds were murdered under Saddam Hussein. As part of her struggle to survive, she became a Kurdish freedom fighter during the Iran-Iraq war. She joins Leonard, as well as her biographer Jean Sasson, author of Love in a Torn Land.

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