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Troubled Artists

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Friday, March 23, 2007

Liev Schreiber and Eric Bogosian discuss the Broadway revival of Talk Radio--about a troubled radio host's unraveling. Then, we talk to the curator of the Martin Ramirez exhibit at the American Folk Art Museum. And we look at some Ethiopian religious icons that are on display at the Museum of Biblical Art. Plus, we ask what's in processed foods like Twinkies, on Please Explain.

Talk Radio on Broadway

Liev Schreiber, Leonard Lopate, & Eric BogosianLiev Schreiber takes us into the troubled mind of an unraveling radio host in the Broadway revival of Eric Bogosian's Talk Radio. He’s here today along with Mr. Bogosian to talk about ...

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Artistic and Schizophrenic Visions

During the last 15 years of his life, Martín Ramírez--often classified as a "schizophrenic artist"--created nearly 300 drawings at the DeWitt State Hospital in northern California. Brooke Davis Anderson, the curator of an exhibit of Ramirez's works at the American Folk Art Museum, explains the importance of his ...

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Ethiopian Objects of Worship

Dr. Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Art Museum, talks about the significance of Ethiopian religious icons and other objects of worship on display at the Museum of Biblical Art.

"Angels of Light: Ethiopian Art from the Walters Art Museum" at the Museum of ...

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Please Explain: What's in a Twinkie?

In Twinkie, Deconstructed, Steve Ettlinger uses the Twinkies ingredient list as a road map for exploring processed food in America. On today's Please Explain, we ask him what common ingredients like Polysorbate 60, Calcium Sulfate, and Phosphates actually are--from how they're made to why they're used in food. Call 212-433-9692. ...

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