Streams

Generation to Generation

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Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Jack O’Brien tells us about the challenges of directing Tom Stoppard’s trilogy, The Coast of Utopia. Then, we find out how conditions like insomnia and mad cow disease can be passed down from generation to generation. And Fritz Weaver and Michael Stuhlbarg talk about their roles in the David Mamet adaptation of Harley Granville Barker’s play, The Voysey Inheritance. Plus: your calls to word maven Patricia T. O’Conner!

Directing The Coast of Utopia

Jack O’Brien talks about the challenges of directing Tom Stoppard’s The Coast of Utopia, a trilogy of plays starring 44 actors in over 70 roles.

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Fatal Neurological Illnesses

In The Family that Couldn’t Sleep, journalist D.T. Max explains how some rare neurological illnesses—like a form of lethal insomnia, and mad cow disease—can be passed down from one generation to another.

The Family that Couldn’t Sleep is available for purchase at amazon.com

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The Voysey Inheritance

Fritz Weaver and Michael Stuhlbarg talk about their roles in the David Mamet adaptation of Harley Granville Barker’s classic play, The Voysey Inheritance.

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Underreported Update

On October 19th, Declan Butler, a senior reporter at Nature, joined us for an Underreported feature on the trial of the "Tripoli Six"--six foreign health professionals accused of deliberately infecting over 400 children with HIV in Libya. On Monday, they were sentenced to death. Declan Butler joins ...

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Words Fail Me

In response to several recent stories in the news about audiences heckling and booing performers, word maven Patricia T. O’Conner delves into the etymology of the heckle and the boo. And she takes your calls at 212-433-9692.
Patricia T. O’Conner answers some frequently asked grammar ...

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