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Celebrate with Tony Bennett

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Tony Bennett left his heart in San Francisco, but he brings his charm and enthusiasm to The Leonard Lopate Show for a conversation about his life as a singer and painter. Then, we continue our election coverage on Underreported, with a look at alternative voting technologies in developing democracies. Plus, we get an update on the trial of six foreign health professionals in Libya--who may face the death penalty.

Tony Bennett on Life, Love, and Rock and Roll

Tony Bennett celebrates his 80th year with a new album of duets—featuring Stevie Wonder, Paul McCartney, Barbra Streisand and many others. And he tells us about his life as a singer and painter.

View Tony Bennett's sketch of Leonard Lopate

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Underreported: Alternative Voting Technologies

On the first half of today's Underreported, we explore some of the alternative voting technologies (like marbles) used throughout the world. Andrew Reynolds, an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, discusses the importance of accessible, accurate voting systems to developing democracies.

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Underreported: The Tripoli Six

On the second half of today's Underreported, we get an update on the "Tripoli Six"--six foreign health professionals accused of deliberately infecting over 400 children with HIV in Libya. The five Bulgarian nurses and one Palestinian doctor have been imprisoned since 1999, and could face the death penalty if convicted. ...

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Tony Bennett's Sketch of Leonard Lopate

In addition to being a singing legend, Tony Bennett is also an accomplished painter. During the interview, you may hear some paper rustling. That's because Tony Bennett was making this sketch of Leonard as they talked.

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