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All in the Family

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Monday, March 13, 2006

On today's show, Macaulay Culkin makes his literary debut with Junior—it's part memoir, part novel. But first, we'll learn about the history and culture of Iranian Jews for the Purim holiday. Plus, we'll talk to two leading jazz musicians: harmonica player Toots Thielemans, and percussionist Paul Motian. And we'll hear about a new novel about a young Hawaiian woman’s family ghosts.

Esther's Children

Houman Sarshar, the author of Esther’s Children, looks at the long history of Jews in Iran—from the first documented settlement in 722 B.C.E., to today.

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Man Bites Harmonica

Jazz great Toots Thielemans--a virtuoso harmonica player and whistler–-describes his unique sound.

Events: There will be a concert celebrating Toots Thielesman's music
Thursday, March 16th at 8pm at Carnegie Hall
For tickets, call 212-247-7800

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The Rythym of a Life

74-year old drummer Paul Motian reflects on his impressive career, and describes what it was like to play with Coleman Hawkins, Thelonious Monk, and Bill Evans.

Events:Paul Motian will be playing as part of the Bobo Stenson Trio
Wednesday, March 15 through Saturday, March 18 at 9 and 11pm
Birdland ...

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Skeletons in the Closet

Lois-Ann Yamanaka shares her new novel, Behold the Many. It’s the story of a young Hawaiian woman who’s haunted by the ghosts of her two sisters, who died of tuberculosis in an orphanage.

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Junior

Most young authors are given the advice to “write what you know.” Macaulay Culkin—of “Home Alone” and “Richie Rich” fame—tells us about channeling his experiences as a child star into his first book: Junior. Part memoir and part literary experiment, the book explores a young man’s feelings towards his abusive ...

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