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Towering Figures

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Wednesday, February 01, 2006

Who gets to decide what is and isn’t art? On today’s show, painter James Rosenquist and a documentary filmmaker weigh in on the matter. Later on, we'll look at the toll radical strip mining is taking on the mountains of Appalachia. And we’ll learn about the life of one of the most influential college presidents of all time: Nicholas Murray Butler, of Columbia. Plus: a look at the comedic side of corporate life.

Who Gets to Call It Art?

Peter Rosen’s documentary "Who Gets to Call It Art?" profiles Henry Geldzahler, the first curator of contemporary art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He joins us today, along with painter James Rosenquist, for a look at how the definition of art changed in New York during the ...

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A Leading Mind

In Nicholas Miraculous, Michael Rosenthal revisits the life of one of the most influential college presidents of all time: Nicholas Murray Butler, the man who served as president of Columbia University for 44 years.

» Read an excerpt of Nicholas Miraculous in the Reading Room ...

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Funny Business

Max Barry's latest novel, Company, is a send up of corporate life. He'll tell us about creating a fictional company run by an absentee CEO, complete with a knockout receptionist and an ambitious new employee.

Events: Max Barry will be giving a talk and signing books on
...

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(re)Moving Mountains?

Erik Reece, the son of a coal worker and a native Kentuckian, exposes the toll radical strip mining is taking on the mountains of Appalachia. In Lost Mountain, Mr. Reece describes the year he spent observing the practice of "mountaintop removal," and he explains the effect it's having on the ...

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