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Thursday, July 14, 2005

In this week’s Underreported feature, we look at the dangers of avian flu, and find out why some scientists worry that it could turn into a human pandemic. Next, Gary Pomerantz revisits Wilt Chamberlain’s historic 100-point game in Wilt, 1962. Pierre Dulaine, founder of the American Ballroom Theater Company, explains how he’s celebrating Bastille Day at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing series. And Nicholas Ostler explains the history of the world’s languages in Empires of the Word.

Underreported: Avian Flu

Avian flu may now be regarded mainly as a threat for birds. But some scientists believe it could become a human pandemic. In today’s Underreported feature, Dr. Michael T. Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), and Peter Aldhous, Chief News & Features Editor Nature ...

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The Night of 100 Points

Gary M. Pomerantz explains what one historical basketball game can tell us about race and community in America in the early 1960s. In Wilt, 1962: The Night of 100 Points and the Dawn of a New Era, Mr. Pomerantz looks into the impact Wilt Chamberlain had on American basketball and ...

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Bastille Day

Dancer and teacher Pierre Dulaine of American Ballroom Theater Company will be celebrating Bastille Day with dance lessons and live music as a part of Lincoln Center's Midsummer Night Swing series. The dance lesson at begins at 6:30pm, and live music starts at 7:30pm.

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Empires of the World

Nicholas Ostler studies the history of the world’s languages, and explains why some languages survive, while others fade away, in Empires of the Word.

Music: Music from “Broken Flowers’ soundtrack; “Ride Your Donkey” by the Tennors and “Yegelle Tezeta” by Mulata Astatke

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