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Battling Repression

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Thursday, April 14, 2005

In our regular Underreported feature, we’ll look at the state of gay rights in the Middle East. Then, Ben Greenman tells us about remixing his short story collection into a new novel: Superworse. Frank Deford revisits baseball in the 1900s with The Old Ball Game. And Steven Levitt uses economics to answer unconventional questions about everyday life in Freakonomics.

Gay Rights in the Middle East

Scott Long, the LGBT director of Human Rights Watch, and Ramzi Zakharia, the webmaster and outreach director for GLAS (the Gay and Lesbian Arab Society), give us an update on the state of gay rights in the Middle East. In the past year, activists in Lebanon have launched a campaign ...

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Superworse

Ben Greenman tells us about using sampling as a literary device to rework Superbad--a collection of two dozen works of short fiction—-into a novel: Superworse.
» More on Superworse
»Visit Ben Greenman's website

Events:
Ben Greenman will be judging a ...

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The Old Ballgame

Frank Deford, a NPR Morning Edition weekly sports commentator, brings to life the earliest days of baseball with a look at two of the biggest players of the 1900s, in The Old Ball Game: How John McGraw, Christy Mathewson, and the New York Giants Created Modern Baseball.

Music: ...

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Freakonomics

The Wall Street Journal has said that if Indiana Jones were an economist, he'd be Steven Levitt. The self-described "rogue" economist speculates on how everyday life is affected by money matters—from what kind of impact Roe v. Wade had on violent crime, to why drug dealers still live with their ...

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