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For the Love of Golf

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Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Television and film composer Earle Hagen began his career playing trombone in big bands during the 30's, and went on to be an orchestrator and arranger for 20th Century Fox studios. One of his most ambitious projects was to write music for the adventure series I Spy, the first time that original soundtracks were used for every episode. He incorporated world music and his own West Coast jazz roots to make a unique sound he called semi-jazz. Hagen died just last year, and he continued to work until the end of his life, sometimes his only fee being a box of golf balls. Tonight, we hear his Harlem Nocturne, a piece he dedicated to Duke Ellington and Johnny Hodges, and used as the theme music for Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer. Also, music of Samuel Barber and Jordi Savall.

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Comments [2]

tMcKnight from manhattan

Laura - what great ears you have, it was indeed Emile. thanks for listening

Sep. 30 2009 07:55 PM
Laura Perrone from NYC

Wasn't that "Emile" -- not "Emily" -- Naoumoff playing a few minutes ago? Bulgarian, child prodigy (I met him at Fontainebleau in the '70s), Nadia Boulanger called him her "little Mozart." Very gifted pianist, musician, composer.

Sep. 30 2009 07:13 PM

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