Streams

Silk Road at the UN

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Thursday, November 27, 2008

Tune in at 8PM for a special presentation of Yo-Yo Ma and The Silk Road Ensemble's recent performance at the United Nations on UN Day. Also, music for the holiday from John Corigliano, Aaron Copland, Ned Rorem, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. And later, we give thanks Baroque-style, with J.S. Bach's lively Cantata "We Thank You, God."

Also Featured Tonight:

Timothy Cameron Lloyd / Four Native American Love Poems
John Cage / "Primitive"
Earl George / "A Thanksgiving Overture"
Philip Glass / String Quartet No. 4 ("Buczak")

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Comments [3]

toni rogers from Dili East Timor

At the edge. Thanks so much. Yoyo and WNYC

Feb. 07 2009 07:09 PM
Patrick from Wyoming.USA

when I seen you on nbc news I was in awww and then I come to this site to listen to your UN concert and was in awwww all over agian. I am a listener of all sorts of music. some people say I am crazy for my music tastes. But I will soon be looking for all your cds to add to my mountain of music for music is a true way to a persons heart and soul and yes what you are doing in the silk road project is wonderful and a true test that all can come together with music so please keep up your wonderful work with all of your friends that you meet and make music. you ALL are great. The bag pipe part was wonderful also wish I new the green haired women that played it to see if she has music of her own out. take care and may peace fill your hearts and bring people together for ever.

Dec. 28 2008 12:20 PM
Sal J. Giardina Jr. from LaPlace, LA, U.S.A. ( a exurb of New Orleans, LA)

Dear Mr. Ma, I am so excited to finally hear you and your group perform, I can not tell you how much. My former roommate in college, Dr. Kenneth T. Calamia, with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, FL tells me that he is a specialist in a unique illness, related to his specialty, rheumatology. In addition, he believes, based upon the demographic patterns of his patients, that the early travelers using the Silk Road transmitted and contracted this illness. How ironic that this path of life was also a path of severe illness.
Just wanted to share this with you so that you might keep this little jewel in you mind.
Respectfully,
Sal J. Giardina, Jr.

Nov. 27 2008 08:04 PM

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