Streams

Valdez Fallout

Thursday, May 06, 2010

Charles Wohlforth, freelance reporter and author of the forthcoming book, The Fate of Nature: Rediscovering Our Ability to Rescue the Earth, discusses the long term fallout from the Exxon Valdez spill and what it might mean for the Gulf Coast.

Guests:

Charles Wohlforth
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Comments [5]

Sylvia from Cordova Alaska

Thank you, Charles, for your highly sensitive take on the disaster in our home. You are so very right, we cannot fix Nature. We cannot cleanup oil once spilled in this magnitude. We naively thought our experience would change the culture of allowing such an oil catastrophe to happen again. But the sadness comes looming back, that we have not demanded the utmost in safeguards. We will continue to pay for cheap oil with Mother Nature herself.

May. 06 2010 02:46 PM

However vile BP is being now, Exxon was far worse. Ultimately, Exxon avoided any substantive financial punishment. BP has admitted some kind of responsibility. To my knowledge, Exxon never admitted anything.

It's also worth noting that questions remain (have maybe even grown) over whether Captain Joseph Hazelwood was made the fall guy by Exxon.

May. 06 2010 10:38 AM
Nick


Interview some people from Greenpoint:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenpoint_oil_spill

May. 06 2010 10:35 AM
GradMontreal from Canada

Anyone know if the $75 million limit of Oil Pollution Act of 1990 would affect the fishermen who will suffer billions?

May. 06 2010 09:48 AM

federal oil tax = less oil used = less money for terror + healthy planet

May. 06 2010 09:25 AM

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