Streams

Dutchess and Putnam Counties, New York

Friday, May 07, 2010 - 01:01 AM

(dougtone/flickr)

Your Anecdotal Census: A People's History of the New York City Area 2000-2010

Tell us about change that matters in your community. Here are some possible questions to answer. Add your story to the comments below!

How is your community different today than it was 10 years ago?

Who's moving in and who's moving out? 

How has the housing boom/housing bust changed your community?

How have the politics of your community changed? If power has shifted in your community, how and why?

How has 9/11 changed your community? 

Do you have a story about change in your own life over the last decade that you think represents a larger trend?

What's an untold story of change in your community that needs to be told? 

By The Numbers:

What story do you think this data tells? Do you think the data reflects what's really going on in your community?

Putnam County, NY1980199020002008/2009
Total Population 77,193 83,941 95,745 99,265
Median Household Income (2008 adjusted dollars) $71,600 $93,100 $93,400 $99,265
% Foreign Born 8.1% 6.75% 8.79% 9.6%
% Under 18 Years Old 31.8% 25.8% 26.5% 23.2%

Explore the Maps:

Putnam County, NY - Median Household Income (2007) - Go to the Interactive Maps at Social Explorer

Dutchess County, NY - Median Household Income (2007) - Go to the Interactive Maps at Social Explorer


More Resources:

US Census Bureau QuickFacts

Social Explorer

More in:

Comments [17]

Chris

Property taxes....One of the people calling in said that they don't know why property taxes have gone up and that it's probably because of wages. Nothing could be further from the truth. It's directly because of too much residential development. As I was quoted on the air, it's the schools. Those with two children are not paying the cost of $48,000 per year, or $72,000 for three. Everyone has to pick up the tab. In other words it's directly because of Development. Every new house costs taxpayers a ton of money.

Aug. 03 2010 12:09 PM
SteveH from B'klyn


This area has been developing since I was a kid, I even worked in summer camp while at college. But the problem here is people move to places like this to grow and raise their families. Schools, sewage systems, roads, traffic lights and all the amenities that people want cost money.

Aug. 03 2010 11:58 AM
steve from mahopac

having been in putnam for 25 years my business clients have changed from nyc fireman and policemen who moved here in the 60's to folks needing spanish and polish translators. the polish population is the biggest surprise

Aug. 03 2010 11:57 AM
Ann Marwick from Putnam

I have lived in Putnam for only ten years but worked here for twenty. I live in Mahopac near the lake. As rich folks move here from the city, they buy up the little old houses on the lake and then dismantle them to build huge homes, leaving no view of the lake. It is sad to see these monstrosities and they change the character of the typical early lake communities. With the wealthy come some good changes. Many of the families are now registering as Democrats thus changing the old-guard Republican attitudes. (I think this was the only county in NY not to vote for Obama.)

Aug. 03 2010 11:39 AM
Jonathan from Putnam County

We still have few minorities in Putnam County, but following the Sept. 11th attack, yuppie families fled the city for the hills and relatively cheap house of Putnam.
The old guard, of Irish and Italian and WASP families called everyone not from the little towns here "City-people" and "carpet-baggers." You couldn't get elected to local posts unless you were born here.
Now, there's a city sensibility and a small town character here.

Aug. 03 2010 11:04 AM
Stephanie from Putnam County

I've lived in Cold Spring for 16 years and yes, there has been more development and yes, taxes have gone up, but the town remains a charming beautiful spot and a fantastic small community. When we first moved here there was political tension between those whose extended families have lived here in Philipstown (Cold Spring & Garrison) for generations and the young families moving up from the city. Now, Roger Ailes (CEO, Fox News) has moved here, bought our beloved local paper and blatantly imbued it with a right wing agenda, rendering everyone just about speechless. What is one of the last small rural WNYC outposts to do?

Aug. 02 2010 09:49 PM
sheila from Cold Spring area

I bought my house in 1999 because it was in a rural setting on a dirt road. Since that time, the road has been paved and a lot more houses have been built along the road. The atmosphere in general in the area has become more suburban than rural.

Jul. 29 2010 11:52 AM
Chris

Putnam County....There has been lots and lots of residential and commercial development. Taxes have doubled. Schools now cost $24,000 per student per year. Average taxpayers are not paying $48,000 or $72,000 in property taxes for school costs. Every new house is a huge problem.

Animal habitat is becoming inhabitable. Character of the area is going fast, from the edge of rural to suburbia. It's a shame, it's a spectacular area of natural beauty with the Appalachian Trail, Hudson River, and much more.

Jul. 02 2010 12:03 PM
Ellen from Brewster

The biggest change in Putnam has been the introduction of the big box stores and the ugly strip malls that went up on every patch of undeveloped green near a highway. Most of these strip malls aren't even fully occupied yet they want to build more. Ten years ago we had a single screen town movie theater now lost to the Sony multiplex in nearby Danbury. Every hardware store in town closed except one after Home Depot opened. The local owner bookstore is history. Still some things are unchanged like our picturesque country lanes running alongside the NYC watershed reservoirs.The small town is changing,but there still is a lot of small town left. Just go to the local IGA grocery store if you want to run into a half dozen acquaintances and find out what's going on in local politics.

Jun. 23 2010 09:52 AM
Yan from Manhattan

Aren't those two towns named after the first two Korean settlers, Mr Fort Lee and Ms Pallisade Park?

May. 11 2010 11:58 AM
rosanne

for starters...it used to be the Bergen
Evening Record even before being called
Bergen Record!

in re: mcmansions...the real shame is the
purchase of small homes which are demolished for the mcmansions and completeliy changing old, established neighborhoods....

May. 11 2010 11:54 AM
Alan from Paramus

Taxes go up and up and up. We can thank corruption and liberalism, which seem to go hand in hand in New Jersey, and in Bergen County.

I for one hate the blue laws and find it offensive that I can't buy certain products on Sunday. I do not buy the "quiet respite" argument that I believe those people falsely offer to cover for the strong religious motivation behind it.

There is an unwritten law that says you can't criticize Democrats without saying, "but the Republicans do it too," but the cold, hard truth is the Democrats have been raping the state for decades, by selling us out to public employee unions, for example, and to their vast and growing entitlement constituencies.

May. 11 2010 11:30 AM
Glenn from Bergen County

Have lived in Bergen County for 40 years. The physical change is the construction of MacMansions which I prefer to call Faux Chateaux. They are ruining the appearance of many neighborhoods. Some communities are trying to deal with problem by changing zoning codes.. Better late than never. Another problem is increased traffic on the highways. Thank goodness Bergen County is prohibiting most businesses from opening on Sunday.

May. 10 2010 12:39 PM
JOHN CARPENTIERI from PARAMUS, NJ

HOW HAS PARAMUS CHANGED
ECONOMICALLY THERE ARE NOW MORE EMPTY STORES ON RT. 17 & RT. 4 THAN IN THE PAST. THAT WAS NEVER THE CASE 10 YRS. AGO.
CULTURALLY OUR POPULATION HAS BEEN INCREASINGLY DIVERSE WHICH IS GOOD. MORE FAMILIES MOVING IN.
THERE HAVE BEEN TOO MANY "MCMANSIONS" BUILT, HOMES W/ NO CHARACTER. THAYT HAS STOPPED.
POLITICALLY, I AM SORRY TO SAY, ITS THE SAME GOOD OLD BOY POLITICS, WHETHER ID REPUB. OR DEMS.
THE BEST THING IS THAT THE TOWN HAS KEEPT ITS STRCT BLUE LAWS.
STILL TOO MUCH TRAFFIC ALL THE TIME.

May. 10 2010 10:52 AM
Carol from Upper West Side NYC

Where do I begin (from the Upper West Side in the 90's)? We've lost so many small service and inexpensive clothing stores for mammoth drug stores, banks, and high cost fashion stores. And the newest mall extension from 97 -100 Streets on Columbus Avenue (Whole Foods, TJMax, Michaels, etc.) is threatening to move a few blocks south by local. I fear real loss of the 'neighborhood' we know. We still have clusters of great restaurants, and are still very multi-ethnic, and some of our buildings are now part of the NORC program (Naturally Occurring Retiree Community). We're still politically active.

May. 10 2010 10:43 AM
Stephanie from Brewster NY Putnam County

It is not anything like it used to be. I miss being able to go to the Cameo movie theater, or Hopes Drug Store, or even feel comfortable walking down main street. Thankfully some are trying to hold on to what once was and try to improve what could be. We now have a beautiful historic farm open to the public, an expansive paved bike trail. Soon our twice weekly farmers market will reopen. Overall I am optomistic. The community just has to realize that Putnam county has potential and we need to work hard to realize it....May I suggest doing something about the old Cameo Theater in Brewster?

May. 07 2010 11:25 PM
junior

in morningside heights it is now little china

May. 04 2010 11:27 AM

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