Streams

Fairfield County, Connecticut

Thursday, April 29, 2010 - 11:13 AM

Listen to the segment here!

Your Anecdotal Census: A People's History of the New York City Area 2000-2010

Tell us about change that matters in your community. Here are some possible questions to answer. Add your story to the comments below!

How is your community different today than it was 10 years ago?

Who's moving in and who's moving out? 

How has the housing boom/housing bust changed your community?

How have the politics of your community changed? If power has shifted in your community, how and why?

How has 9/11 changed your community? 

Do you have a story about change in your own life over the last decade that you think represents a larger trend?

What's an untold story of change in your community that needs to be told? 

Dante's Take

As part of the Patchwork Nation project, Dante Chinni has been exploring demographic trends around the country. He tells us what to watch for in Fairfield County...

→ Visit the Fairfield County page on Patchwork Nation for lots more!

By The Numbers:

What story do you think this data tells? Do you think the data reflects what's really going on in your community?

Fairfield County, Connecticut 1980 1990 2000 2008/2009
Total Population 807,143 827,645 882,567 901,208
Median Household Income (2008 adjusted dollars) $68,200 $86,60 $84,300 $84,250
% Foreign Born 10.7% 12.2% 16.9% 20.8%
% Under 18 Years Old 26.9% 22.6% 25.6% 24.9%

Explore the Maps:

Fairfield County, CT - Median Household Income (2007) - Go to the Interactive Maps at Social Explorer


More Resources:

US Census Bureau QuickFacts

Social Explorer

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Jan. 17 2012 07:37 AM
chester dale from old greenwich

bigger egos, bigger cars, fewer bicycles. The kids aren't playing on the streets, just sell 'lemonade'.
Historically valued homes go in the dumpster, to be replaced by spec neo-shingle style mausoleums.
the last little lots get cleaned-up for sale .

At least Greenwich imposed a 'nature set-aside' regulation for every lot division, but it was years too late for here along the water. All the untended wildflower spots have been prissied-up with non-native Home Depot sameness.

Aug. 05 2010 11:24 AM
p w ritter from Fairfield, CT

How I agree with some of your commenters, especially Jessica (I think) of Westport, though thank goodness it's not yet quite that bad in my neighborhood, though we do have three new mini-mansions after knockdowns. And noise from yard 'grooming' - YUK!
But one thing I've noticed from following the real estate listings is the change in buyers' names. Used to be mostly New England Anglo-Saxon plus Irish, Italian and Hungarian names. Now there are more and more Oriental, India-Indian, African and what-are-they? named buyers.
We also are getting a THIRD train station for Metro North communter stops; now under construction, should open in a year or two depending on finish of actual station building and parking lot.
We're sort of a city (58+ K) that refuses to acknowledge it; still have New England Representative town meeting and MUCH volunteer participation in town boards, commissions & committees.
I hope to be able to live in our (40 years now) house until after the knockdown economy dies. Only homes that are safe are those in our three historic districts, guarded by the Historic District Commission that has to pass on even minor changes like re-roofing, fences and window shutters -- removal, changes, etc. They meet monthly because they need to.

Jul. 30 2010 11:38 AM
david franco from wilton

What has changed over the last 10 years is the sense of entitlement among newcomers. This runs the gamut, from ignoring stop signs and traffic lights; speeding in Wilton Center (the small commercial heart); refusing to signal for a turn; parking the huge SUV in front of the coffeee shop (where it says "no parking") and rushing loudly, equiped with bluetooth, in front of customers; talking incessantly about how advanced their small children are, children who themselves do not yet talk; endlessly and not subtly discussing the new kitchen or addition or the recent European spa trip
.
Of course, the list goes on. And it goes on loudly, more like announcement than conversation. It would seem the money attached to the mansions has brought with it an influx of self-centered and largely uninvolved citizens who cannot abide what their income can't influence.

Folks actually brag about living in a town they hadn't even heard of 10 years ago.

Jul. 20 2010 11:18 PM
Sarah from Greenwich

Traffic!!! I grew up here lived in the city for many many years and am now back. The traffic today is horrendous! One used to be able to drive on 95 North or South and get anywhere from Fairfield, Norwalk, Darien, Stamford, Rye, New Rochelle in about 20 mins. Now the traffic during Rush Hour is abominable both North and South. It takes 20 mins to go from exit 6 to exit 3.

Jun. 23 2010 09:10 AM
Beatrice from Westport, ct

I moved from Norwalk to Westport, CT to get a better community and neighbourhood.
In addition to all that has been said, the big difference that I am finding is the explosive numbert of small children that are around in my street!
Beatrice
203 222 7758

Jun. 22 2010 11:23 AM
Andrew from Bridgeport

Bridgeport, once considered the "arm pit" of Connecticut is now seeing an influx of young professionals (20's - 30's). These are folks, including myself, who cannot afford to start out a career in other parts of FFLD county such as Stamford and Norwalk. Some can afford these more expensive areas but the dollar goes further in Bridgeport. For example, I am currently renting my condo to two recent graduates for $1200 ( a two floor condo, 2 bed room, walk in closets, water front property, and walking distance to metro north). This is unheard of in the more expensive towns. However, I imagine the day will come when Bridgeprt too also becomes priced out such as in the Black Rock area.

I have also noticed some very interesting dynamics in Bridgeport. The north end of Bridgeport, which has historically been the middle class area, is slowly deteriorating. Between taxes and the housing crisis people are subletting and renting their homes. These are the lucky ones, others have foreclosed. People are spread thin and less money goes to the up keep of homes. So homes are looking delapitaed. More so than ever before. So i think the interesting thing is that this is a more suberban area of Bridgeport, but now it is as though the downtown area and anything close to rail lines seems more auspicious. Many people from New york are also buying up homes in Bridgeport.

My neighbohood in Bridgeport's southend, which borders Long Island Sound and the University of Bridgeport, has changed demographically. Ten years ago it was all Latino and African American. It is now an eclectic blend of Latino, African, American, White, Indian, and Chinese. My neighhood is a small enclave for Indian and Chinese students, many move into this neighborhood from overseas. In my 8 unit complex alone I have two Chinese working families, a Latino Phd Student, A white Chiropratic student, an engineering professor, a Chinese and Cambodian student. I love this diversity. Bridgeport is still very rough around the edges, but it has becomes increasinly diverse and many interesting people from other parts of FFLD county and from around the globe have moved into my neighborhood in the South End. I also worry about many of the working families who are struggling. Many of them are already being priced out and are moving to the valley.

Bridgeport still have its problems. I have cope with the loitering and rowdy individuals, but at the same time I can still walk to the beach in two minutes and sip my coffee while admiring the scenic view of long island sound. I would to walk 30 minues+ to do this in Stamford or Wesport because everything by the water is not affordable to us young folks. So until I am priced out of Bridgeprt I will continue to enjoy my short walks to the beach at 7:30 am during the Summer and continue to sip my cofffee while I check out the sailboats sailing along Long Island Sound.

Jun. 15 2010 11:09 PM
leatrice fountain

We moved from NYC to Greenwich in 1954. There was a far smaller gap between rich and poor. Most families lived quite well on one income. Women stayed home and minded kids. Most men did their own lawn work.Neighbors interacted more closely. Children and animals had free range of their neighborhoods. There seemed to be less stress to acquire more goods, larger houses, bigger cars, etc. I would say we were a happier society

Jun. 08 2010 12:37 PM
David Silverglade from Easton, CT

President Historical Society of Easton
2010 Census Worker
Anthropologist

I grew up a New England Yankee in Easton, which is dead center in Fairfield County. It has the smallest population in the county, 8,500 persons, and an average Upper Middle Class income.

INCREASE IN LAST DECADE:
Developers trying to break our town's strict two-acre zoning regulations - it is the "red line" in local Easton politics. Our regs were developed by our farming community in 1941, including a no-new businesses ordinance, which still stands.

A particular repeated fight against the CT Siting Council is versus CELL PHONE TOWERS. Easton has none, and the residents repeatedly vote in classic New England Town Meetings against them.

(I am really offended by your many callers describing their terrible experiences in central Fairfield - I suggest that WNYC listeners in Fairfield have NY roots, not Connecticut roots)

Jun. 08 2010 11:58 AM
Christine from Weston, CT

We've lived here for the past seven years and in that relatively short time, I've seen numerous small businesses close only to be replaced by nationwide chains. Before my time here, there was one independent book shop, now there are none. Barnes and Noble is the only game in town and it is incredibly frustrating to have to drive to NYC or at least New Canaan to find a bookstore owner who actually reads and knows something about literature, history, etc. Motor vehicle traffic continues to increase both on the highways and local streets. One positive is that there are more and more people like my family who are transplanted Manhattanites with young families who vote Democratic so the local demographics in Weston are certainly changing from conservative, Republican to more liberal Democrat. Brian asked the question of why Obama and I think this answers it in part.There may be fiscal conservatives still coming in because this is by and large an area filled with investment banking/financial types, but their politics are more progressive in terms of social issues. I know that Westport and Weston used to be a draw for artists/creative types, but that has dramatically changed. Obviously the Westport Playhouse founded by Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward is in Westport and the Westport Arts Center still provides a lot of local cultural events, but this community really is filled with hedge fund managers and investment bankers as unfortunately, they are the only ones who can afford the housing prices here.

Jun. 08 2010 11:46 AM
Chris from greenwich, ct

Have lived in Greenwich nearly 20 years. The extremes -- of wealth, and of poverty -- have increased. Yes, it is a wealthy town, but wealth is not as homogeneously distributed, as in other towns. Greenwich has 3 Title I schools; we have over 10% free/reduced lunch student population. (And approx. 20% of students go to private school.) The Town has 3 housing projects. The economic "downturn" has hit this Town across all lines. Charities have been hit, the food pantry is seeing HUGE numbers, and while there is still a great deal of wealth, it's not what it used to be.

Jun. 08 2010 11:44 AM
Jason Burger from Norwalk

I live in Norwalk and work at a restaurant in Westport that has been there for about 14 years. I've been working there for over five years and when I started there were lines out the door and all of us waiters were making great money. Starting about two years ago, we cut back on staff and now the waitstaff probably averages about half to two-thirds of what we used to make. I think this represents the cutbacks made by a populace that has been living on credit to maintain a quality of life above its collective means. As a sidenote to the taxing conversation and Republican movement in FC, there are efforts to start a Tea Party movement in Westport (God help us all) and I regularly wait on Republican strategists and fundraiser groups that regularly lament the faults of the Democratic extablishment, et al.

Jun. 08 2010 11:41 AM
Carl from North Stamford

Deer, Deer, Deer everywhere! A few Turkeys too...

Jun. 08 2010 11:40 AM
Meg Scarpetta from stamford, CT

What has changed? TRUMP PARC STAMFORD and all the other development. The town has no plan, no soul and is all about build, build, build. While the diversity of restaurants have improved over 12 years, the taxes we pay versus the quality of the city is a lose, lose. Malloy did the city of Stamford no favors but Stamford-ites are pretty apathetic as citizens.

Jun. 08 2010 11:37 AM
Dorian from Norwalk CT

Oh, one more thing. Was talking yesterday to a mother of three at a bakery in Norwalk. She's a completely typical suburban mom -- minivan, nice house, husband who works at a tech company in NY ... and she's a Muslim of South Indian heritage. One of her colleagues, who was also at the bakery (the SoNo Baking Company), of Irish-American descent, said she was 20th century, but the mother of three was the new, 21st Century Norwalk.

Jun. 08 2010 11:35 AM
Dorian from Norwalk, CT

Been listening and reading these w/ great interest, in hopes that sites we've been working on (TheDailyNorwalk.com was first, then Wesport, Fairfield, Darien & others) are a fair representation of neighbors, communities. Love the multi-textured comments both here and on the air. Thank you, Brian.

Jun. 08 2010 11:32 AM
Jessica Bram from Westport, CT

(continued) ....
Two years have passed and the developer has now put the finishing touches on a sparkling, towering white mansion across from my small house. It has a three-car garage, two-story entrance, balcony, and in back, a 40-foot swimming pool whose construction had required the felling of three gorgeous maples, which were sadly in their full tangerine autumn glory the day they were cut down. The reason, I learned was to prevent leaves from falling into the pool. For maximum coverage – meaning maximum home square footage – the house sits close to the road, taking up most of the deep lawn that Rocky used to roam.

I still host the annual holiday party, although not too many of the long-timers still live on the street. I know that many of the young fathers, and some mothers too, work at hedge funds or investment banking jobs. I know that their homes, now priced well into the seven figures, were most likely funded with those bonuses I have read about but can only imagine.

The bonfire was discontinued years ago. The thick spruce and a huge cottonwood tree at the end of the road, which had dangerously dropped a few large branches and determined to be rotted inside, had also had to come down.

Now, with my older sons are grown and my youngest driving his own car to high school, I no longer stand at the school bus stop. Instead as I pass my young neighbors – the ones with the big houses - I wave to them as they shepherd aside their children and a tangle of well-groomed dogs in newly developed breed mixes that no one had heard of a decade ago.

And now it’s my house, with its one-car garage and sagging split rail fence, that looks out of place. I don’t recognize my street any longer. I wanted to grow old on the same street where my sons once played. But that street is gone.

When the economy crashed and real estate values sunk last fall I thought, at least one good thing will come of all this. The teardowns will surely have to stop. After all, two barely new mansions on neighboring streets now sit empty. But no, when I suggested this to the developer who finally came by to remove his construction sign, he was smug and unperturbed. “Things are picking up again,” he answered, with a satisfied smile. When I read about the second quarter profit reports from Goldman Sachs and Citibank, and that hefty bonuses would be restored, I knew that he was right.

Time to move on? Maybe so. But for today, the idea of my sons’ playroom tumbling into a pile of rubble, the imagined sight of my brick chimney standing naked and defenseless against a vacant back lawn, is just too much to bear.

Jessica Bram (c) 2010

Jun. 08 2010 11:28 AM
Jessica Bram from Westport CT

(continued from previous post)… on either side, and took up every inch of land from one property line to the next, leaving only the slimmest alleyway on either side.

I
n the five or six years since then, with real estate values ballooning, construction vehicles became a constant presence on the street. Six more homes on my street have now been torn down. Each was quickly replaced with a new mansions in shades of grey or tan, one blander and more towering than the next, and each one wedged as close as to their property lines as the zoning regulations allow. By now perfectly nice people have moved into them, really – most of them young families with two or three toddlers, and parents who look barely in their thirties, The fathers set out early mornings in expensive cars for the train station.

Two summers ago, my neighbor Sandy told me she was moving. Developers had been knocking on her door, offering large sums for her near acre of property on the cul-de-sac. It didn’t take long to receive the bad news: she had sold the house to one of them, in an all-cash sale that would fund her son’s last years of college tuition.

It was hard to say good-bye to Sandy. But worse still was that soon after Sandy moved away, a yellow bulldozer appeared on the lawn, where it sat for two days, deceptively small and evil like some lethal poisonous insect. Then, even with my windows closed, the sound of destruction filled every room of my house. As I pulled out of my garage or glanced out my dining room window, there was no averting my eyes from the bulldozer and its wreckage across the street. The scene left me with a heavy heart ...

(continued)

Jun. 08 2010 11:26 AM
Jessica Bram from Westport CT

I couldn’t tell you exactly when it was that I noticed that my house no longer belonged on my street.

When I first moved to Westport only eleven years ago, one of the things that most attracted me about this coastal Connecticut town was that it was not snobby. Once known as a haven for artists and writers, the town included people who drove mostly beat up Saabs and Volvos, and only occasionally a Mercedes that had seen better days. Neighbors raked their own leaves and weeded gardens. I loved that I could enroll all three of my kids in the town’s summer day camp program, at a fraction of the cost of private camps. Another happy discovery was that most of my sons’ new friends would be home most of the summer, unlike those in our former suburban community where sleep-away camp was de rigueur. We live in the country, after all – and better yet, our new town had a long public beach on Long Island Sound.

Most of all, I loved my street. There was a nice mix of families, young and not so young, many of whom, as luck would have it, had boys my sons’ ages. But there were older generations, too – people who had owned their homes a few decades, raised children here, and then settled down with their dogs and gardens and daily walks from one end of the road to the other to keep fit. In December the tall spruce tree at the end of the road would be decorated with lights, and I loved how the lit tree would gleam against a black sky directly into my bedroom window at night. By longstanding tradition – no one could tell me when it first began – the families gathered in the cul-de-sac every year for a brief Christmas eve bonfire, where Santa in full regalia would drive up in a red convertible, to distribute gifts that had been surreptitiously dropped off in advance at one neighbor’s house. Our house was situated on the cul-de-sac, so as the bonfire waned I would usher my neighbors in for hot cider and cookies before they headed home to their own celebrations.
I had wanted so badly to belong to a community when I moved to this town, as a recently divorced single mother. I was determined to put down roots – to stay here perhaps even after it became hard to climb the stairs to the second floor. I imagined that my sons would return with their wives and families, with children who, after big family meals, would gallop up to the same messy attic playroom where my sons had once disappeared for long hours as well.

I suppose the day it all changed was when the first house came down. I hadn’t even noticed the bulldozer, but suddenly one evening all that was left of a small maroon cape up the street was a stone chimney rising alone from a pile of rubble. Within a few months a new rectangular yellow house, with high window revealing a two story front hall and giant chandelier, had replaced it. The new house towered over its neighbors .... (continued)

Jun. 08 2010 11:22 AM
Rebecca from Ridgefield, CT

I've lived in Ridgefield the whole 24 years of my life. The phenomenon of McMansions predates this past decade, I believe, but what's new is that fewer of them are selling. My dad is a carpenter and often works on million dollar spec houses that never find any buyers. Our favorite is a brown monstrosity up the road that we call the Lego Mansion.

About the noise issue - before the housing crash, a lot of people moved in here and immediately began complaining about the noise. There is virtually no noise in Ridgefield. People have big lawns here, and you have to mow them. That's been a constant since we stopped using cows. People come here with unrealistic expectations of suburban paradise and the local paper becomes peppered with letters by women who say they cry themselves to sleep at night when they hear the airplanes booming overhead. As will not be much of a surprise to your readers, many people in Ridgefield (and Fairfield County overall) have a poor sense of perspective.

Jun. 08 2010 11:18 AM
Karen from Trumbull

A big change in recent years are the different types of wildlife that we see in our suburban back yard - wild turkeys, eagles, fox, of course deer! We even had a hawk perch on the top of our swingset as it eyed our cat. All this on a small 1/3 acre lot...

Jun. 08 2010 11:16 AM
DH2 from Rowayton, Norwalk

I grew up in Darien, and have resided in Rowayton for the last ten years. The former has declined in desirability, the latter over the 00's outgrew most of F.C. Individual plots are much smaller in Rowayton, probably average 1/4 the size of Darien plots, and the new McCottages are often separated by a mere 15 feet [variances], but this lends itself to feelings of community, something akin to the goal of a Seaside [New Urb], and not really available in most of Darien. Very little foot traffic in downtown Darien [has never been], while in downtown Rowayton at all hours until 10pm the street is busy with walkers. Both share the same demographic, 95% white and wealthy, but diverge sharply on personal boundary needs.

Jun. 08 2010 10:59 AM
pat ferris from old greenwich, ct

Biggest change in the 10 years-
DEMOLITIONS, The character of the neighborhood has been transformed. Little capes are practically gone. Anyone who buys razes what is there and builds a huge house way bigger than before. Usually the landscape is cleared as well. Goodbye to many trees and shrubs. It makes me sad.

Jun. 08 2010 09:09 AM
Ellen LoGuidice from Fairfield

A phenomenon I have noticed is the amount of professional lawn care workers. You just don't see kids out there mowing their own lawns every Saturday like we did when we were kids. The days are gone in FFLD County where little Jimmy mows the neighborhood lawns for $10 a pop!

Jun. 07 2010 06:13 PM
Alice L. Knopf from Westport, CT

I lived in Westport CT for 48 years until I moved to NYC 10 years ago. I went back to Westport a few months ago. I found the bookstore on Main Street was a Talbots, the Westport bank was a Patagonia and there was a Tiffany on Main Street. "Nuf said.

Jun. 07 2010 12:10 PM
Grace from Weston

I've lived in Weston for almost all my life, and I've noticed the large amount of reconstruction: old houses being turned into the typical Fairfield county vaulted mansion-homes, or new, huge houses being put up. Many of the "poorer" families (who are still probably middle-class) have either moved out of the town, or moved to different streets.

As for the politics of the community, it almost seems to be a clash of the ages: due to the big money in the area, the parent/grand parent generation seems to be republican, while the younger generations are most certainly democrat. Obviously, Chris Shays was the incumbent republican for my area for a long time, but the boom of 18-25 year old democrats finally pushed in Jim Himes, who, in my opinion, is altogether unremarkable and pales in comparison.

Jun. 07 2010 12:01 PM
Yosif from Norwalk

I'm from Norwalk, CT and my neighborhood went from being black and white, to black, white, and a lot more brown. Several new latino families have moved in and it has been great to have them.

Jun. 07 2010 11:40 AM
Richard Hokin from Darien

My neighborhood, although on the water, is predominantly 1/6 and 1/3 acre parcels, postwar affordable housing. In 37 years we have seen seen big fluctuations in the number of kids, which has increased substantially from the time our kids were growing up. We also have seen serious gentrification, if such a phenomenon is possible in Darien, which has brought tear downs of some of the generally modest homes that were here in the '70s. In a number of cases the replacements have been the largest permissible footprint and interior volume, devoid of any relationship to the site or the neighborhood, not to mention being genuine architectural atrocities. Nonetheless, it remains a cohesive neighborhood and a great place to raise kids.

Jun. 06 2010 08:01 PM
Jo from Westport

During our 39 years in Westport, we've seen local businesses decrease, traffic increase, the size of houses explode though they now seem to sit on the market endlessly. We have a beautiful new senior center and a tastefully renovated and improved Westport Country Playhouse. The library now seems far busier and provides more varied use. Book groups abound. We have two farmers' markets, but few people raise their own vegetables. More people commute into town than out of it. The population is on average more affluent. Unskilled (and often skilled) labor is most often Hispanic--my husband jokes that he is the only person mowing the lawn who doesn't speak Spanish. Life here is faster and different, but Westport is still an exciting and vibrant community.

Jun. 05 2010 10:21 PM
Amy Bock from Ridgefield, CT

I have lived in Ridgefield CT for over 13 years, during that time it has become increasingly noisy in our community. The weekends have become an almost endless stream of noise from loud gardening equipment. It sounds like an industrial zone. Even holidays are not exempt from their obnoxious drone. Leaf blowers are the worst culprits; their noise carries up to 1/2 mile away. One finishes (finally!) and then the next one starts up. Add to that, loud chain saws, power washers, wood chippers and weed wackers being used from 9:00 am till the sun sets. People reach for these machines without a thought, there is no consideration for your neighbors. Though Connecticut law states: “You have a right to ‘quiet enjoyment’ of your property, free from noise that rises to the level of nuisance”, I certainly don’t feel that I am getting that and am very frustrated about not being able to enjoy nature and my garden which were the very reasons I moved here from NYC years ago.

Jun. 04 2010 05:33 PM
Agi Hale from Trumbull

I live in Fairfield county - Trumbull, change? here? none - it was boring 20 years ago and it's boring now. Events, are pathetic. I guess I'm just a city person. I love New York City or most cities. I miss the culture and the mix. Lot of people will not agree with me, but - dying in connecticut is redundant.

Jun. 04 2010 02:00 PM
Mary Ann Hoberman from Greenwich CT 06831

In my neighborhood in the "back country" (north of the Merritt Parkway) of Greenwich CT, the tear-downs of perfectly good houses to construct in their places and often on spec look-alike, look-at-me five-garage, ten-bathroom McMansions has changed both the character and the demographic of the area. The result has been that the remaining "normal-sized" houses look out-of-place; and each time one is sold, we wait for the wrecking crew to follow. Probably the only positive fallout of the current economic situation has been the halt in new building.

Jun. 04 2010 11:05 AM
Mark from Weston, Connecticut

Weston, Connecticut no longer has a single farm. The last one was purchased by the town together with the Nature Conservancy. With this addition about 20% of the area of the town is a park, bird sactuary, preserve or resevoirs. Not a bad thing, just different. The schools were updated and expanded for the larger school age population maintaining the top national ranking, but also keeping taxes higher than many other towns. You get what you pay for. The next generation of residents are placing huge down payments for million dollar houses and typically have advanced degrees from schools like Johns Hopkins, Duke and Northwestern. Still wonderful neighbors, wonderful people and families but not kids that went to Queens College and lived at home. Not a bad thing, just different.

Jun. 03 2010 01:52 PM
Jay from Norwalk CT

I live in Norwalk CT and I am a demographic shift because I moved here from Brooklyn NY in 2003. I am part of the change that has occurred in my community. I live in a working class neighborhood where the majority my neighbors are lifetime residents. The housing boom has hurt my community by reducing prices, causing vacancies and ultimately making it difficult for people to sell there homes. The major trends - problems that I see are lack of mass transportation - 95 and Merrit PKWY are too congested and Metro North is very expensive and traffic is getting worse. I believe that as more people move to and work in the area, communing patterns become more diverse- less NYC bound. Bus service is sporadic and therefore only the poor are relegated to using it. Lastly, there is a lack of affordable housing. Housing cost are very high in Fairfield County partially because if the high medium income. It is very difficult for a single person making a moderate income to maintain housing here. Ethnically speaking, like many suburbs, more Hispanic people are moving in.

Jun. 03 2010 11:44 AM
Gillian Grozier from New Fairfield

My small town in the north of Fairfield County has changed very little over the last ten years. Post 9/11, we did get an influx of Wall Street types looking for second homes and a safe place for their families. But that trend has expired. I do find a combination of traffic, lack of public parking at train stations and infrequent train schedules make it much more difficult for me to visit New York City. As a result I feel cut off from the City's diversity and cultural life, a real loss.

May. 27 2010 07:23 PM

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