Streams

Bronx County, New York

Monday, April 26, 2010 - 11:36 AM

Your Anecdotal Census: A People's History of the New York City Area 2000-2010

Tell us about change that matters in your community. Here are some possible questions to answer. Add your story to the comments below!

How is your community different today than it was 10 years ago?

Who's moving in and who's moving out? 

How has the housing boom/housing bust changed your community?

How have the politics of your community changed? If power has shifted in your community, how and why?

How has 9/11 changed your community? 

Do you have a story about change in your own life over the last decade that you think represents a larger trend?

What's an untold story of change in your community that needs to be told? 


By The Numbers:

What story do you think this data tells? Do you think the data reflects what's really going on in your community?

Bronx County, New York 1980 1990 2000 2008/2009
Total Population 1,168,972 1,203,789 1,332,652 1,397,287
Median Household Income (2008 adjusted dollars) $32,500 $38,100 $35,700 $35,108
% Foreign Born 18.4% 22.8% 29.0% 32.7%
% Under 18 Years Old 29.2% 27.6%% 29.8% 27.9%

 

Explore the Maps:

Bronx County, New York - Median Household Income (2007) - Go to the Interactive Maps at Social Explorer

More Resources:

US Census Bureau QuickFacts

Social Explorer

More in:

Comments [10]

Maria from Egdewater Park

I recently moved into Edgewater park in the Bronx and years ago I would have never step foot here. This area has changed there are yong couples who have moved in, some with families others without. The oldest generations are moving out and as they do those who take their place are fixing up these homes beautifully!

Jul. 27 2010 11:24 AM
G. McCleave from Woodlawn Heights

I have just moved to the North Bronx from brownstone Brooklyn.
Beyond a doubt the Bronx is the ugliest of all the boroughs - there is very little of anything beautiful and old left after the hordes of contractors have left their tasteless mark - there doesn't seem to be any kind of building codes enforced so that everyone just does as they want and the result is horrible - no planning,no interest in architectural quality, no enforcement of building codes is what I've been seeing.
The area I've moved to is still pretty nice but it too is falling prey to the contractors who come in and buy a 1920's home, tear it down and build a four apartment brick with a basement garage and asphalt the area where there used to be a front garden. I'm talking about Woodlawn Heights. It is so sad.
My question would be - do we as residents have any recourse to stop this blight? What are the zoning laws and how to get them enforced?

Jul. 27 2010 08:43 AM
Rich from The Bronx from The Bronx

Emperor Bloomberg's mantra: build, build, build has become very shortsighted and narrowminded. There was no effort or forethought put into his plan. Self certified contractors were a disaster. It was all about greed. The neighborhood that suffered the most as a result of this was the South Bronx. Huge tracts of vacant open space destroyed with hundreds of apartments buildings, no character, no style, no architectural clarity and certainly no additional green spaces or vestpocket parks. What happened to variety? One and two family free standing homes, 10 to 12 family apartment buildings and throw in a few attached homes [Ugh, the worst], the norm in the South Bronx for the sake of expediency is the behemoth 200 family style apartment building. The 89 ranch style homes (Charolette Gardens) built in the late 1970s and early 1980s was a model for the future of the South Bronx. It was unfortunately deemed a failure by many demographers since it only housed a little over 350 people. Charolette Gardens was for the most part indicitative of the variety that the South Bronx needs today. Understandable that this is not the country, but the outer boroughs should not be relegated to the same population densities the likes of which Manhattan faces on a daily basis.

Jul. 26 2010 11:33 PM
Lucy Aponte from Soundview

I remember when the Bronx was burning and was a victim of those fires, twice in my life. The empty lots made the neighborhoods look like war torn cities. I hated the tenements. Today I'm glad for the smaller private old homes. It's true, the newer homes are poorly made, but the old homes are beautiful. There are more trees on the blocks and the parks have been greatly improved. As an artist in the Bronx, I see more arts and cultural programs and activities for families, although we can use more. I'm glad to be part of bringing arts to the Bronx. Soundview Park had concerts going this summer, for the first time and we have a lively Friends of Soundview Park group doing exciting things. The Bronx River has kyaking, canoeing and more. I love the Bronx and I'm excited about good things going on here.

Jul. 26 2010 08:22 PM
Lucy Aponte from Soundview

I remember when the Bronx was burning and was a victim of those fires, twice in my life. The empty lots made the neighborhoods look like war torn cities. I hated the tenements. Today I'm glad for the smaller private old homes. It's true, the newer homes are poorly made, but the old homes are beautiful. There are more trees on the blocks and the parks have been greatly improved. As an artist in the Bronx, I see more arts and cultural programs and activities for families, although we can use more. I'm glad to be part of bringing arts to the Bronx. Soundview Park had concerts going this summer, for the first time and we have a lively Friends of Soundview Park group doing exciting things. The Bronx River has kyaking, canoeing and more. I love the Bronx and I'm excited about good things going on here.

Jul. 26 2010 08:15 PM
Lucy Aponte from Soundview

I remember when the Bronx was burning and was a victim of those fires, twice in my life. The empty lots made the neighborhoods look like war torn cities. I hated the tenements. Today I'm glad for the smaller private old homes. It's true, the newer homes are poorly made, but the old homes are beautiful. There are more trees on the blocks and the parks have been greatly improved. As an artist in the Bronx, I see more arts and cultural programs and activities for families, although we can use more. I'm glad to be part of bringing arts to the Bronx. Soundview Park had concerts going this summer, for the first time and we have a lively Friends of Soundview Park group doing exciting things. The Bronx River has kyaking, canoeing and more. I love the Bronx and I'm excited about good things going on here.

Jul. 26 2010 08:01 PM
Mario

Most of South Bronx continued to see a large amount of new construction in the last decade (mostly created through government-sponsored affordable housing programs) but the type of housing being built has significantly changed.

In the early 2000s, there was still lots of construction of one, two, and three-family suburban style ranch homes on the vacant lots where a building once stood that had burned down in the 70s or 80s. Many of the buildings that burned and were later bulldozed had 40, 50, or 80 units, and they were solidly built, quality prewar buildings - the same kind that are desperately sought after in places like the Upper West Side. Starting in the 80s, and throughout the 90s and early 2000s they were replaced by some of the most cheaply constructed, poor-quality ranch homes that looked belonged in the middle states, not the Bronx. Where 40 families once lived, now two have a poorly thrown together home and a driveway.

The suburban redevelopment of the Bronx was a travesty, and it has a lot to do with why we have such a hard time finding new places to develop affordable housing now that the burnout is over and the city's population in increasing, not decreasing; the vacant land was used up with these suburban homes. The tremendous power behind the New York City Housing Partnership and the Nehemiah Houses is responsible for nearly all of this failed vision.

I'm glad to see that the Bronx is now being mostly developed by six, seven, eight, and ten story brick buildings, built on the full lots, up to the sidewalk line, and blending as much in as new construction seems to ever do these days with the old prewar structures. I'm happy that this past decade may have finally marked the end of the suburbanization of the South Bronx.

Jul. 26 2010 11:07 AM
John from The Bronx

Last night's rain storm reminded me of another change I've noticed in The Bronx with increasing frequency during the past ten years: climate change!

My neighbor asked why I was so interested in the storm because they're always strong in his country. I reminded him that the Dominican Republic is tropical, and that I never saw so many intense lightning bolts, heavy rain and window-shaking winds when I was a kid in Duh Bronx!

Also roses are blooming more frequently in May (instead of June), daylilies in June (instead of July), and roses-of-Sharon are starting in late June-early July (instead of late August, heralding the approaching school year).

Jul. 24 2010 01:27 PM
John from The Bronx, NY

I have noticed, despite all of the verdant vocabulary I hear, that The Bronx is becoming less green. Many new houses are completely surrounded by concrete (sometimes with ecologically useless squares of lawn). Older homes are "cleaning up" by removing the once ubiquitous privet hedges (AKA Ligustrum spp., used in the healthful Chinese tea, Kuding Cha (various spellings)-- look it up). Too many people believe concrete, asphalt and metal is better than unkempt greenery; They Are Wrong.
Biodiversity Trumps Neatness!

PS Anyone else notice the lack of chickadees during the last few winters?? (After much searching I discovered that West Nile Virus has decimated their populations in the Northeast US, without much attention. Celebrities and sports are unavoidable, while the Silence of the Chickadees is unacknowledged :..(

Jul. 21 2010 08:29 PM
Mikhail Karadimov from Bronx, Co-op City

Gentrification. What a hot button topic. Our community sees it too. These strange strangers migrating from their strange lands, flocking, flying, arriving in relentless waves from up North, plopping themselves down in our neighborhood, busying our streets, chewing out our greenery and leaving a wake of mangled grass and dirt behind them. I'm talking about those Canadian invaders of ours, those blasted geese. At first they were here only through the winter, on a mere vacation; they respected that it was our territory, our co-op. They knew not to squat for too long, for their Maple-Leafed nation beckoned for them to return once summer rolled around. Hell, even I felt pity for the black and brown feathered birds; I felt nothing but remorse, as well as anger, when witnessing an ignorant child pelting an innocent trio of geese with his collected pebbles. But--if I may be so bold as to say--now that time has passed, now that the geese have decided to stay for good and hold up traffic with their chain of waddling brats or destroy every field or stadium we've ever built, I can't help but have my fingers and palms tremble with the urge to pick up a handful of pebbles myself.
Just the other week, while I was crossing a patch of grass--a shortcut to my apartment building--I heard a pat, pat, pat scurrying across the ground, a light and almost soundless sprint. When I turned to look over my shoulder, there he was, the daddy goose, wings spanned out, neck craned to its fullest height, beak snapping and squawking its battle cry. He was running right for me, ready to attack. Needless to say, I yelped and made a dash for the building's nearest entrance, barely making it.
This wasn't the only instance of abuse, mind you. There was another instance in which every goose of the Section Four gang (there are five sections in total in Co-op City) was watching me as I headed over to my local garage. The next thing I knew, their leader was flying right at me. I had to drop to the ground, legs and arms sprawled out across the geese-poop-stained path, my face only inches away from the sickly yellow, dry crud, just to avoid a direct collision. It's as if the goose was fighting me for what used to be our mutual territory. No longer was it a mutual territory, not after my humiliating display of defeat....
Co-op City no longer belongs to us. It's theirs now.

May. 05 2010 10:00 PM

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