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Smoker's Delight

Monday, April 05, 2004 - 04:55 PM

On this morning’s show, we followed up on our April Fool's call-in about Mayor Bloomberg’s proposal to “ban smoking in your own home”.

We thought that there was enough silliness in my tone of voice, and that there were enough clues sprinkled throughout, including our “happy holiday’ disclaimer at the end (not to mention our fake city councilwoman “Phyllis Morris”). But the feedback continued to come in over the weekend that many of you believed it, and more importantly, that some smokers were made really upset by it.

We’ve been doing April Fool’s segments for years and years and this is the first one that has had this kind of effect. The call-in this morning was primarily for smokers on what is revealed by this as an underlying issue: That it could be believable that the mayor of New York might propose to outlaw smoking in your own home!

We took calls from smokers to about what it’s like to be a smoker in today’s world.

-BL
Email us your thoughts.

here is a selection of some emails we received...


The most intense anti-smoking campaign in history was launched by Adolf Hitler, a little known fact…Liberty and responsibility are directly correlated-- one cannot enjoy liberty without a proportional amount of responsibility. Careful what you non-smokers wish for lest we end up as infants of the state.
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While I agree that your joke was made easier to fall for by the eroding of civil rights generally, I hope that the reactions smokers had will open their eyes to the sadness of their addiction.
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I have been harassed on a daily basis over my smoking. I can tell without exaggeration that during my 15 minute walk to get my lunch everyday I have had as many as 8 people tell me to stop smoking.
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Nobody cared about smoking until the health insurance lobby became more powerful than the tobacco lobby.

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