Streams

Predicting Redistricting

Monday, March 29, 2010

Professor of sociology at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center, Andrew Beveridge, talks about the Census and what it will mean for the upcoming redistricting.

Just Launched! "10 Questions That Count" Census Home Page

Guests:

Andrew Beveridge
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Comments [3]

Steve from Brooklyn

What about the US Census tracts? I'm an epidemiological researcher and I've used these in my research. I find them to reflect populations heterogeneity well.

Mar. 29 2010 10:58 AM
the truth from Bettheny

Whaaat did he say??? Keep minorities together? WHO exactly wants to keep minorities together? Hope I am writing this in the correct segment.

Mar. 29 2010 10:56 AM
Derek from 42nd St.

Is the census needed? The Census according the US Constitution is mandated to apportion the representatives by State. Why has the US Congress not expanded its membership since the 1910 census and why did the Congress freeze the membership at 435 in the Reapportionment Act of 1929. The congressional distinct sizes have tripled in population (212,000 to 650,000) while the Congressional House membership has been stagnant at 435. If this is truly a representative government we need to increase the House Membership. This also affects the Electoral College and Presidential elections.
Also the Method of Equal Proportions is a disaster for apportionment and an equal divisor method would be ideal with a fixed number of people per Representative.
Please visit http://www.thirty-thousand.org/ and http://www.publiclaw62-5.org for more information.

Mar. 29 2010 10:46 AM

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