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Wired for Medicine

Friday, March 19, 2010

Executive editor of Wired Magazine Thomas Goetz tells us how to take advantage of cutting edge medical science in his new book The Decision Tree: Taking Control of Your Health in the New Era of Personalized Medicine.

Guests:

Thomas Goetz
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Comments [4]

Matt from UWS

One of the emerging trends that undermines Goetz's common sense approach is "concierge medicine". Essentially people with money insist that they get immediate attention and every screening test possible even when they are relatively healthy:

http://www.annals.org/content/152/6/391.abstract?aimhp

Concierge Medicine: A “Regular” Physician's Perspective
Michael Stillman, MD
Annals of Internal Medicine (March 16, 2010)

Mar. 19 2010 11:43 AM
Troy from Carroll Gardens

Ah...never mind...

Mar. 19 2010 11:41 AM
Troy from Carroll Gardens

Can you all repeat that health test Web address? I zoned out there for a second...

Mar. 19 2010 11:40 AM
Nick from NYC

So, just took the lifemath.net test... and its top recommendation:

take a daily baby aspirin

BUT.... what about this? This is the typical pushme-pullyou back and forth health info that I think drives us all crazy!

Who do I believe?

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/daily-aspirin-therapy/HB00073
By Mayo Clinic staff

Daily aspirin therapy may lower your risk of heart attack and stroke, but daily aspirin therapy isn't for everyone. Is it right for you?

You should consider daily aspirin therapy only if you've had a heart attack or stroke, or you have a high risk of either.

Mar. 19 2010 11:40 AM

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