Streams

Developing a Blueprint for Post-Recession Governance

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

Drum Major Institute just published From Disaster to Diversity What's Next for New York City's Economy. Co-editors Dan Morris, DMI Communications Director, and Adam Friedman, Pratt Center for Community Development Director, discuss this new book.

Guests:

Adam Friedman, and Dan Morris
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Comments [3]

gaetano catelli from downtown manhattan

"Bill", an actual NYC manufacturer (who seems to be doing everything he can to avoid re-locating) calls in to say that what small businesses need from gov't is *lower* costs.

so, your guests propose *increasing* costs yet more -- akin to blasting more holes in the side of the Titanic.

what i think is so funny is that people like your guests think that it is the Sarah Palins of the world, and their followers, who are the fools.

Jan. 06 2010 11:30 PM
Jeff from Brooklyn

A hard lesson should be learned from the recent HBO series Schamatta Rags to Riches in the fashion biz. Giving away our manufacturing jobs is curtailing the development of niche sourcing and development.
http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/schmatta/index.html

Jan. 06 2010 11:14 AM
Jon P. from The Garden State

The only way NYC could bring back manufacturing is if they bring back the crime rate of the 70’s and 80’s. This would scare out all the hipsters, yuppies and other well to do that are currently way over inflating property value. There’s just no way NYC can compete with the South or the Midwest’s low cost of living and taxes. Even if NYC gave away land for free most manufactures could not afford to pay its employees and taxes and still be profitable just so they can put NYC on the address of their manufacturing facilities. Other then that, there are no benefits.

Manufacturing in NYC is just a pipe dream now.

Jan. 06 2010 11:08 AM

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