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Episode #51

Phones + Mischief: From Muggers to Dennis Crowley

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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

This week New Tech City takes you into the bodegas, laundromats and back alleys of New York's black market for stolen cell phones.

More than 15,000 handsets were snatched in the city last year alone.

AT&T's chief security officer says theft is just one of the ills smartphone owners face: Your phone can also be spammed, hacked, hijacked and attacked in countless other ways.

WNYC's Ilya Marritz and host Manoush Zomorodi review what you can do to protect your devices. 

Plus, Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley eulogizes Red Burns, the so-called "godmother of Silicon Alley," who passed away last month at the age of 88.

Understanding the Smartphone Black Market

This week, Apple introduced a new iPhone. Among its features: fingerprint recognition and other security measures that could make the device harder to re-sell if it’s been stolen. But it’s up against a sophisticated black market that has had six years to cater to the world’s insatiable appetite for second-hand smartphones.

Comments [1]

Foursquare's Dennis Crowley on the 'Godmother of Silicon Alley'

Foursquare co-founder and CEO Dennis Crowley was a student of Red Burns, the so-called "godmother of Silicon Alley," who passed away at the end of August at the age of 88.  

Comments [2]

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Comments [3]

Adel from Marycow ID

Fingerprint lock instead of a password is great for the convience of the user. I doubt it would hinder a hacker.

Sep. 12 2013 01:28 PM
johnnyapples

Getting your phone jacked is the price of being a yuppie. Getting mugged is the price of displacing real New Yorkers.

Sep. 12 2013 09:17 AM
Nicholas

Just wanted to comment that now in iOS 7 (apple's latest version of iOS to be released next week) it requires your iCloud account password in order to wipe it.

Sep. 11 2013 12:58 PM

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