Streams

Newark After Booker

Friday, August 16, 2013

Polls indicate an easy victory for Newark Mayor Cory Booker in October's special election for NJ's open US Senate seat. But win or lose, Booker is not running for reelection in Newark's mayoral race, and the post-Booker era appears imminent. NJ Today correspondent David Cruz discusses Booker's legacy, and takes a look at what's next for New Jersey's largest city, including the tricky business of determining a successor.

Guests:

David Cruz
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Comments [8]

Bill Chappel from Newark

The media have not covered Mayor Booker’s mismanagement of Newark. The corporate media have bought into Booker’s “hero mayor” myth and have not come to Newark to report on this inept absentee mayor.
The TV news will never tell about Booker sending a carload of high priced lawyers against citizens of Newark (Committee of Petitioners) who collected 5000 signatures and submitted the “Save Our Water” ordinance to the City Council. By a vote of 6-0, the Council adopted the first citizen initiated ordinance in memory. Does the Mayor exceed to the wishes of the people? No, he goes to court to advance his highly unpopular Municipal Utilities Authority (MUA). Booker intended to turn the new MUA over to the Newark Watershed Conservation and Development Corp (NWCDC). Like a true corporatist, Booker had already ruined the 40-year-old NWCDC by turning it into a patronage mill.
In court, the Newark Water Group (Committee of Petitioners) prevailed resulting in the dissolution of the NWCDC.
I grade Booker A+ for tweeting and F for management.
:)
Mark Elliot Zuckerberg CEO of Facebook announced today that he has ended a hoax launched as an April fool’s joke while he was a student at Harvard University. Mr. Zuckerberg revealed that Mayor Cory Booker is not real. Booker having no actual physical existence resides only in the cloud in cyberspace. Zuckerberg said that while they were students he and his Harvard classmates Dustin Moskovitz, Eduardo Saverin, and Chris Hughes created Booker as a digital experiment when they were co-creating the social networking site Facebook. He said that Bookers physical image is a digital composite derived from old photos of ousted politicians. When asked why he created Bookers digital image without hair, Zuckerberg said, “A digital baldhead would not waste much hard-drive space on Booker”.
Zuckerberg said that it is time to set the record straight before Booker could do any more damage. He said that hackers had already manipulated the Booker into placing the Newark Watershed CDC into the hands of a bunch of insider profiteers and the next disaster would be to form a Municipal Utilities Authority.
When questioned about the Zuckerberg revelations a Newark City Hall spokes person said that Mayor Booker had not been seen lately, that his Facebook account had been deleted and his incessant tweeting had mysteriously stopped.

Aug. 16 2013 01:54 PM
David Yennior from Belleville, NJ

Newark has made tremendous improvement since Booker has served on the Council and then as Mayor. The job of running a medium large city, a former industrial economic hub, with many minorities, failing schools, and 40% of the city being comprised of tax exempt entities, is very difficult. Serving as US Senator will be easier, but Cory Booker is driven. Expect seeing a hard working Senator in the mold of Hillary Clinton or Ted Kennedy.

Aug. 16 2013 12:19 PM
Erika from Newark

UGH!!!! I didn't know that being an eloquent charismatic speaker made you a great Mayor and will somehow make you an even better Senator.
I'm from Newark and one of the problems with Booker is that he ignored, discounted and refused to work with and acknowledge grassroots organizations based in Newark that have and continue to help Newark residents. He chose to seek advice and "money" from outside people who don't have a clue about the needs and wants of Newark residents. When did being a celebrity/millionaire/billionaire make you more knowledgeable about education, unemployment, poverty and urban renewal?
There are many Newark residents who were not happy with Sharpe James and still not happy with Corey Booker. It's not an either or situation. If you really want to know how Newarkers really feel about their city, go to a council meeting, PTA meeting, Board of Ed meeting. Talk to people who actually live in Newark, love Newark and will continue to fight for Newark.

Aug. 16 2013 11:52 AM
Outspoken from the city of Newark NJ

The community has spoken, with their vote! Cory Booker is an eloquent speaker and well liked in the community. To suggest anything else is ignorant.

Aug. 16 2013 10:35 AM
BK from NJ

Sharpe James was a laughingstock. Booker brought immediate legitimacy to Newark. The guest did sum it up best when he stated that Booker as a COO might have lacked (then again he has to deal with te city council and other vested interests). He will do well in the Senate. Good luck!

Aug. 16 2013 10:29 AM
john from office

I have heard Booker called Too "white" by people being interviewed in Newark, just because he speaks well and does not pander. You cannot win!! Bring back Sharp James HNIC

Yes, the traffic here is light.

Aug. 16 2013 10:26 AM

WBGO (88.3 FM, wbgo.org), the Newark-based NPR jazz station just mentioned, often comes in pretty clearly for me in Bklyn when WQXR 105.9 does not.

Sunday nights are a treat for those with vintage tastes in radio: The Golden Age of Radio airs on WBAI from 7-9 p.m., and "Jazz from The Archives" is on WBGO from 11:00 p.m. to midnight.

Aug. 16 2013 10:24 AM

Summer Friday's seem to see the fewest number of comments on these pages, no?

Aug. 16 2013 10:16 AM

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