Streams

"Hopper Drawing" at the Whitney Museum

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Curator Carter Foster talks about Edward Hopper’s drawings, and how they provide insight into the artist's process. “Hopper Drawing” is on view at the Whitney Museum of Art through October 6, and it features more than 200 drawings, paired with some of the artist's most famous paintings, including “Nighthawks” and “New York Movie.”

Edward Hopper (1882–1967) Nighthawks, 1942.

Oil on canvas, 33 1/8 x 60 in. (84.1 x 152.4 cm)
The Art Institute of Chicago; Friends of American Art Collection  1942.51 

© Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Photography © The Art Institute of Chicago

 

Edward Hopper (1882–1967) New York Movie, 1939 .

Oil on canvas, 32 1/4 x 40 1/8 in. (81.9 x 101.9 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York; given anonymously  396.1941
© Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital Image.
Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

Edward Hopper (1882–1967) Study for Nighthawks, 1941 or 1942.

Fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper; 11 1/8 x 15 in. (28.3 x 38.1 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase and gift of Josephine N. Hopper by exchange  2011.65

Edward Hopper (1882–1967) Study for Office at Night, 1940.

Fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, 15 1/16 x 19 5/8 in. (38.3 x 49.8 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest  70.340

Edward Hopper (1882–1967) Study for Office at Night, 1940.

Fabricated chalk and graphite pencil on paper, 15 1/16 x 18 3/8 in. (38.3 x 46.7 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest  70.341

Guests:

Carter Foster

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Comments [1]

Barlow from astoria

As a so-called 'emerging artist,' I got a lot out of this drawing show. There seems to be a 'tradition' of AMerican realism reaching back generations. But Isn't there a disconnect in the art world between honoring the great 20th century realists -- like Hopper, Grant Wood, Thomas Hart Benton , Bellows -- and finding outstanding contemporary artists that build on this tradition.? We celebrate an awful lot of installation, video and other conceptual gimmicks, but where are the heirs of Hopper?

Aug. 14 2013 12:05 PM

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