Streams

That Infrastructure Advocacy App Has 10,000 Users Already

"I'm Stuck" App sends 1,700 emails to Congress in first two weeks

Monday, August 12, 2013 - 01:48 PM

WAMU

A smartphone app that part soap box for complaining about traffic and part infrastructure advocacy has generated 1,700 letters to Congress after two weeks on the market. 

The "I'm Stuck" app from Building America's Future has been downloaded more than 10,000 times, according to the group, which advocates for more federal spending on roads, bridges and mass transit.

The app is designed to let delayed travelers vent a little bit through a small act of political participation. A few taps on the app will send pre-written emails to their Congressmen and Senators asking for more federal spending to fund infrastructure projects that would speed up transit, air traffic or highway congestion. Drivers might get the most enraged by traffic, but the app reminds users texting while and driving is dangerous so it's best used when not behind the wheel. 

Former Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell is the organization's co-chairman, and says the emails send the following message: "Look, I'm stuck in traffic. I am sick and tired of having infrastructure in this country that is out of date. It's inadequate. It's dangerous, and it's hurting us economically. You guys have the power to fix it. Do it now."

Rendell says he hopes a flood of emails will convince elected leaders that infrastructure is something that's okay to spend on.

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