Streams

NYC's New Health Commissioner

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

New NYC Health Commissioner, Thomas Farley, discusses what he thinks Washington health care reform can do for New Yorkers. And, lest you forget, the swine flu is back in the news and still on the DOH’s agenda.

Guests:

Thomas Farley
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Comments [8]

Amy from Manhattan

Dr. Farley mentioned focusing on treating hypertension rather than letting it cause a stroke & then treating that. But he didn't get specific about treatments for high blood pressure. I'd like to know how he feels about approaches that use diet to reduce or even eliminate the need for drugs to reduce blood pressure. He's probably heard of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet--not a fad diet but one that's been tested by the NIH's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (info at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/dash_inbrief.htm). Every time a friend tells me they've been diagnosed w/high blood pressure, I ask if their dr. mentioned the DASH diet to them, & the answer is always no. Why don't more dr's. know about this? Could NYC start a public awareness program about it, like the one about helping people quit smoking?

Jul. 21 2009 11:40 AM
Stefanie from west village

As for smoking in public, I've long wanted to propose to Bloomberg the idea of the "smoking corral" -- a tent-like space that will exist around every five blocks in midtown. Smoking will be made totally illegal in public -- on the street. And smokers will have to pay for the privilege of entering their corral. The funds will go to anti-smoking efforts. Once they are confined to only smoking in their apartments, perhaps these people will get the message and I will no longer have to inhale their disgusting smoke on the street.

Jul. 21 2009 11:20 AM
Eddie in Brooklyn

Doesn't Mr. Farley's quick summary of Anti-smoking PSAs grossly underestimate the persuasiveness of messaging and graphic arts? It sounded like any language and any ole graphic thrown in a poster would suffice. Which sounds like how the government throws money at a problem without much thoughtfulness.

Jul. 21 2009 11:20 AM
Scott_A from Astoria

Electroplate the subway handles/bars with copper.

Hospital research shows that step would probably have a bigger effect on cutting swine flu and other germs than just about anything else you could do for the money.

As a part of epidemic planning, it may be worth a short-term expenditure to install hand sanitizer pumps in in subway stations so that riders can clean their hands on the way out (only install/use during high-risk situations).

Jul. 21 2009 11:20 AM
thomas from brooklyn

What about disease prevention in terms of promoting healthy eating? We talk about warning signs for smoking, but what about fast food? Can we do more to promote healthy eating? affordable organics, local foods, farmers markets that take food stamps etc...

Jul. 21 2009 11:20 AM
Karen from NYC

Fifty-two girls got sent home to Manhattan from my friend's daughter's summer camp in Maine -- all had swine flu.

Jul. 21 2009 11:19 AM
Donna DiGioia from great river, NY

i am a masters student of public health with a concentration in dental health. what is the commisioner's plan for assessing and treating oral health problems in NYS and especially Suffolk County? Is there any advice you can give to me as a student of PH?

Jul. 21 2009 11:16 AM
George from Bay Ridge

What is the commissioner's plan regarding mosquitoes after the heavy rain these past few months?

Jul. 21 2009 10:10 AM

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