Streams

Mothers and Daughters

Friday, July 26, 2013

Katie Hafner, author of Mother, Daughter, Me: A Memoir (Random House, 2013), talks about what happened when her mother moved in with her and her teenage daughter, and takes calls from listeners who also have experience.

Guests:

Katie Hafner
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Comments [5]

Truth & Beauty from Brooklyn

My husband is Indian and they don't have any of these multigenerational issues. They live together easily in extended families and share everything. Even his children, who do not live with us, tell him that he can have access to their bank accounts should he need money.

I think the American psyche is so geared toward independence that we make a fetish out of what is "mine" and what is "yours" and we can't seem to share - which is a precept we are supposed to learn in kindergarten - and play well with others - which we are also supposed to learn in kindergarten.

This woman's story is a shame. I understand her resentment of her mother after a traumatic incident in childhood, but as long as her mother is not using household money to feed her addiction, they need to grow up and move on.

Jul. 26 2013 11:01 AM
Roberta from Brooklyn

Dr. Freud Never Sleeps!

Jul. 26 2013 10:52 AM
Anonymous from New York

Well bring on the "immigrants" jgarbuz...be damned if I want a robot taking care of me.

Jul. 26 2013 10:51 AM
A Mother and a Daughter from Brooklyn

A twisted reality, the relationship between mothers and first born daughters and now grandmothers.

Jul. 26 2013 10:50 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

In Japan, robots are becoming the answer. More and more robots are being used to take care of those who can no longer care for themselves. Robots will be the answer, unless we want to bring in even more immigrants?

Jul. 26 2013 10:48 AM

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