New Yorkers Protest After Verdict in Trayvon Martin Case

At least 1,000 people -- and possibly many more -- took to New York streets and into Times Square Sunday evening in response to the Florida verdict finding George Zimmerman not guilty of murder in the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin.

The march started with a rally in Union Square at 6 p.m., where people chanted "no justice, no peace" and "all power to the people." The crowd left the park, marching through the East Village and the Flatiron District before turning north.

A police line at 34th Street stopped marchers moving up Seventh Avenue, and officers were heard telling protesters to "keep it civil." The crowd then moved to, and up, Eighth Avenue. They cheered as they reached the lights and honking cabs of Times Square about 9 p.m., and later sat in the street -- fully blocking traffic.

Part of the crowd later reached Harlem, marching up Malclom X Boulevard. After midnight, some continued into the Bronx over the 145th St. Bridge, according to a tweet by Daily News reporter Irving DeJohn.

Live video streamed by protesters showed a handful of people detained in a scuffle with police on the Upper East Side, but the NYPD would not say whether any arrests were made as of late Sunday. Overall the protests were peaceful, with the police allowing them to continue and directing traffic along the way.

The crowd skewed young, and one could feel the influence of Occupy Wall Street, which had promoted the rally. But early in the evening, the march also included families with children.

Sunday afternoon, several memorials were written in chalk on Union Square's sidewalks reading "we are all Trayvon." One had the outline of a body with a can of Arizona ice tea and bag of Skittles, items Martin had bought and was carrying the evening he was killed 17 months ago.

City Councilman Jumanne Williams among the protesters, wearing a black hoodie with white lettering that read "unarmed civilian."

Meanwhile, Mayor Bloomberg is taking aim at Florida's and other states' so-called "stand-your-ground" laws, which allow deadly force when someone feels threatened. He says they can "inspire dangerous vigilantism and protect those who act recklessly."

While not commenting directly on the verdict, Bloomberg did criticize what he called "shoot first" laws, saying they're drafted by gun lobby extremists and let people "shoot first and argue 'justifiable homicide later."

City Councilmember Jumaane Williams leads protest at Union Square against not guilty verdict in George Zimmerman trial.
City Councilmember Jumaane Williams leads protest at Union Square against not guilty verdict in George Zimmerman trial. ( Brigid Bergin )
Protesters at Union Square made memorials for Trayvon Martin, the unarmed teenager shot to death by George Zimmerman.
Protesters at Union Square made memorials for Trayvon Martin, the unarmed teenager shot to death by George Zimmerman. ( Brigid Bergin )
At least 1,000 protesters march down Broadway from Union Square Sunday in response to Florida verdict
At least 1,000 protesters march down Broadway from Union Square Sunday in response to Florida verdict ( Brigid Bergin )
Demonstrators head north toward Times Square during a rally protesting the George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict in the death of Trayvon Martin
Demonstrators head north toward Times Square during a rally protesting the George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict in the death of Trayvon Martin ( Brigid Bergin )
 Marchers make it to 42nd Street, are greeted by honking cabs during a rally protesting the George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict in the death of Trayvon Martin
Marchers make it to 42nd Street, are greeted by honking cabs during a rally protesting the George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict in the death of Trayvon Martin ( Brigid Bergin )
Protesters hold an image of Trayvon Martin in front of the U.S. Armed Forces Recruiting Center in Times Square.
Protesters hold an image of Trayvon Martin in front of the U.S. Armed Forces Recruiting Center in Times Square. ( Brigid Bergin )
of