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We're Number (Fifty) One! We're Number (Fifty) One!

Thursday, May 28, 2009

According to one insurance company, New York State drivers are the worst in the nation - at least in terms of answering questions on a written test. Wade Bontrager, senior vice president of GMAC Insurance, talks about the survey.

Guests:

Wade Bontrager
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Comments [7]

hjs from 11211

b
and i propose that all states require that any driver above the age of, say, 65 have to requalify for their license on an annual basis.

May. 28 2009 03:10 PM
B from NYC

I propose that all states require that any driver below the age of, say, 25 have to requalify for their license on an annual basis. And then use the written test as a diagnostic test.

Certainly drivers below the age of eighteen should have to qualify on an annual basis until they are twenty-one.

I

May. 28 2009 01:07 PM
lauren from Asbury Park

I was recently in PA and met a man who worked in PA as a roadway engineer designing highways. He said NJ sets the standard for highway design, and other states look to NJ for traffic patterns, etc.

what really gets me are the people who just act like idiots - forgot turn signals, drive slow in the left lane, the 'gawkers', etc.

May. 28 2009 12:01 PM
mc from Brooklyn

Ask your guest what a flashing green light means. (Seen in MA)

May. 28 2009 12:01 PM
Jim from Tuxedo,NY

NJ drivers go through red lights, don't stop at yield signs, almost never signal, and drive slow in the left lanes on all the highways. And we're the ones that are bad.

May. 28 2009 11:52 AM
mc from Brooklyn

I can't believe we are worse than MA drivers!

May. 28 2009 11:31 AM
hjs from 11211

u can't say we are the worst based on one test!

besides when i see a bad driver in the city s/he has out of state plates!

May. 28 2009 10:57 AM

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