Streams

Cityscapes: What's Next

Tuesday, May 05, 2009

Over the past month the Cityscapes series has explored how we got to this architectural moment. So: what's next? Paul Goldberger, architecture critic for the New Yorker and Liz Diller, principal at the firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro, talk about the future of architecture in New York City. Follow Along With the Cityscapes Slideshow!

Guests:

Liz Diller and Paul Goldberger

Comments [9]

resident from nyc

The revitalization of the High Line; an abandoned railway structure- is being realized by an incredible team of talented designers including the landscape architect Field Operations, the planting designer Piet Oudolf, the architect DSR,and countless others. The main advocates were the non-profit 'Friends of the HighLine'-For a more complete picture of this incredible floating park: see http://www.thehighline.org/

May. 10 2009 08:02 PM
Barbara from Park Slope

Park Slope beautiful? If you ever wanted to see the bastardization of a neighborhood take a walk down the streets of Park Slope, or take a look at Grand Army Plaza. Paul Greenberger has no idea what he's talking about, except in that he is talking to himself and not the inhabitants of the slope.

May. 05 2009 11:07 AM
Ted Todorov from Upper West Side

As a pedestrian (don't own a car) and a very frequent Lincoln Center visitor (especially for movies at The Walter Reade and Alice Tully) I am appalled by the description of the changes as pedestrian friendly.

Yes, the new ATH lobby looks nice, but the elimination on the Broadway side of the large staircase going up to Julliard and the Walter Reade, the large open space in front of ATH with the the trees, and overpass across 65th street are pedestrian hostile in the extreme. How "opening up" the barren 65th street is good for pedestrians is beyond me. The overpass was an absolute boon to pedestrians.

In general opening up blocked cross streets is better for *cars*, not pedestrians. A pedestrian could walk across Lincoln Center between Columbus and Amsterdam (and have a very enjoyable walk) -- a car couldn't.

Did anyone actually ask New Yorkers who walk or take the subway to Lincoln Center what they thought of these changes?

I am amazed that all of this went completely unchallenged on the show.

May. 05 2009 11:06 AM
hjs from 11211

u would not believe the ugly structures that were thrown up in williamsburg during the last boom. sometimes beautiful late 19th century building were torn down for quick "profit." are there any nonprofits that save older building with architectural interest?

May. 05 2009 11:01 AM
antonio from the mean streats of park slope

Guess Paul doesn't stray down to 5th/4th avenue too much in the slope, the new buildings are awful!

May. 05 2009 11:01 AM
antonio from the mean streats of park slope

Guess Paul doesn't stray down to 5th/4th avenue too much in the slope, the new buildings are awful!

May. 05 2009 11:01 AM
licnyc

I think all architects are just awful. Ask your guest why every single building looks like a giant refrigerator. I seriously want to know- its always knock down a beautiful building to build a "modern" glass box that looks like crap

May. 05 2009 10:54 AM
licnyc

I think all architects are just awful. Ask you guest why every single building looks like a giant refrigerator.

May. 05 2009 10:54 AM
antonio from the mean streats of park slope

Can't we just bring back the original penn station?

May. 05 2009 10:41 AM

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