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Doors' Drummer John Densmore; the True Story Behind "The Searchers"; a Life in the Movies; Aaron Neville

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Friday, July 05, 2013

John Densmore talks about being the drummer in The Doors and the conflicts that grew along with the band’s success. We’ll look at how the story of Cynthia Ann Parker has inspired operas, plays, and John Ford’s classic movie “The Searchers.” New Yorker writer Margaret Talbot tells us about the life and career of her father Lyle Talbot, a star during the early days of Hollywood. Plus, Aaron Neville on the release of his latest recording “My True Story.”

John Densmore on The Doors: Unhinged

Drummer John Densmore talks about his time in The Doors and about the conflicts that broke out as the band became more successful. His book The Doors: Unhinged is part memoir and part exploration of the what makes some people focus on attaining wealth, even at the expense of principles and friendships.

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The Searchers, an American Legend

Glenn Frankel tells the story behind “The Searchers.” In 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches, raised by the tribe, and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years later she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and Texas Rangers and reunited with her white family. It’s become a foundational American tale and has inspired operas plays, and a novel by Alan LeMay, which was adapted into one of Hollywood's most legendary films, “The Searchers,” directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. In The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend, Frankel examines how the story has been shaped over time.

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Movies, Magic, and Memoir

New Yorker writer Margaret Talbot uses the life and career of her father, Lyle Talbot, an early Hollywood star, to tell the story of the rise of popular culture. The Entertainer: Movies, Magic, and My Father’s Twentieth Century is a combination of Hollywood history, social history, and family memoir, conjures nostalgia for those earlier eras of 1910s and 1920s small-town America, and the 1930s and 1940s in Hollywood.

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Aaron Neville

Grammy Award-winning singer Aaron Neville talks about his latest album, “My True Story” and his upcoming tour. Neville revitalizes some of his favorite songs from the doo-wop era and beyond, including “Tears on My Pillow” and “Under the Boardwalk.” In March PBS will air the special Aaron Neville: Doo Wop: My True Story—a concert filmed in November at New York’s Brooklyn Bowl. Neville was joined by musicians and guests including Paul Simon, Joan Osborne, Eugene Pitt of the Jive Five, and Dickie Harmon from the Del-Vikings.

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