Streams

Global Risk-Taking

Friday, May 01, 2009

Ian Bremmer, executive at Eurasia Group and co-author of The Fat Tail: The Power of Political Knowledge for Strategic Investing (Oxford University Press, 2009), talks about political risks and global investing.

Guests:

Ian Bremmer
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Comments [4]

Amy from Manhattan

"Mountains of SUVs & lakes of ethanol" aren't neutral when it comes to the environment. Or even the economy--corn ethanol has already driven up the cost of corn-based foods as corn is diverted from that market to be made into fuel, & the global warming that SUVs contribute to will have less immediate but major effects on the economy. The short-term investment value of these products can't be isolated from their other effects. Isn't that how we got into this financial mess?

May. 01 2009 11:53 AM
Telegram Sam from Staten Island

This guy totally ripped his premise off from Nicholas Taleb's book "The Black Swan," which came out 3 years ago - prior to the current crisis. Taleb said a "black swan" is an unexpected event, and his theory was that these events are becoming more and more common in the modern world, and that investors should take this into account. Is he gonna mention Taleb or be a weasel?

May. 01 2009 11:39 AM
Roger

What can this book tell me that typical investment book can't. I mean isn't political risk a standard concern when investing overseas?

Are there quantitative tools in this book? If there are none, then the book is useless. Could I google what he has to say on political risk?

Basically what is so special about this book that I need to buy it?

May. 01 2009 11:37 AM
Michael West from Green Wood Heights, Brooklyn

Look, New York OWNS Washington. China notwithstanding, the western economy is written in Manhattan (and those who do the writing live in Brooklyn, Staten Island, Jersey and the suburbs). The notion that DC is taking over the financial helm is more than short sighted.

May. 01 2009 11:33 AM

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