Streams

A Family Divided

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

New York Times reporter David Gonzalez tells the story of one mixed (immigration) status family in Queens. He is joined by a member of the family, daughter "Marisa."

Guests:

Marisa and David Gonzalez
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Comments [11]

Mike from Inwood

Gonzalez states: "these people are here and we have to deal with them" and they are "educated and have American values". First, if they leave and are no longer here, we don't have to deal with them. Second, if they return to their countries with their taxpayer-subsidized CUNY educations, wouldn't that benefit the countries they move to? And what would be wrong with that? It's not like it's a violation of their human rights to live in Mexico or wherever. It's possible to live a good life there, too.

Apr. 29 2009 02:50 AM
JP from The Garden State

Try becoming a citizen of Mexico and being born in United States. Way more difficult then the other way around. Try owning land in Mexico as a Untied States citizen. You can own land but once you die, you cant pass it on to your family or any other American citizen.

Apr. 28 2009 11:58 AM
JP from The Garden State

Try becoming a citizen of Mexico and being born in United States. Way more difficult then the other way around. Try owning land in Mexico as a Untied States citizen. You can own land but once you die, you cant pass it on to your family or any other American citizen.

Apr. 28 2009 11:58 AM
Mike from Inwood

Children of illegal aliens are a mixed bag. There are ones like the college graduate interviewed on this show and some that are more like violent gang members. My solution: First make it very difficult to employ illegal aliens so that they will self-deport. For these children and young adults caught here at this particular time in immigration history, perhaps some combination of an English test or whether or not they have a college degree or name your own criteria would roughly separate the ones to leave from the ones to stay.

Apr. 28 2009 11:55 AM
Mike from Inwood

Gonzalez said something about legalizing people because the economies of their native countries have been ravaged by NAFTA. No one can doubt that Americans have lost their jobs and found themselves in an financially-inflated world also as a result of NAFTA. Would these countries where their jobs have moved allow them to migrate there so that their now poverty-level wages would go further?

Apr. 28 2009 11:51 AM
RCT from NYC

We are good friends with a family from Ecuador, some of whom came here as illegals. Everyone is now a citizens or has a green cards, but achieving that goal has taken the family over 17 years. They are a great family with wonderful values. The fact that such families are not being admitted legally to the U.S. demonstrates that there is something wrong with our immigration laws governing immigration from Mexico, Cenral America and South America.

Apr. 28 2009 11:48 AM
sheeeeeeeela from ny, ny

It bugs me when parents tell their children that they gave up their dreams to make a better life for their kids. At some point in middle age most of us realize the dreams we had when we were 20 are not going to come true. And that's not always bad - something else that we didn't dream of may happen that is just as rewarding. Or not. But it's not necessarily true that the children are the reason the dreams don't come true.

People without children also have to surrender their dreams sometimes! And people coming here are probably doing it as much for themselves as for their children.

Apr. 28 2009 11:47 AM
bob from huntington

breaking the law has consequences. the fact that this young woman's parents were educated would suggest that they were fully informed about the consequences of their decision to come to the U.S.

despite what she feels, her parents are responsible for her plight.

Apr. 28 2009 11:45 AM
john savne from new york, ny

i read the nyt story the other day. while i sympathize with the young lady on a personal level, i feel like something is missing from this story. certainly, marissa's parents knew what the consequences were going to be for their daughter, staying in the US beyond what she was legally permitted. the laws -- unfair as they may be -- are not a secret. they are well-known. why is there nothing being said about her parents' role in this...i know it's always more fun to blame society, but how about taking a little personal responsibility? they gave up their dreams for what?

Apr. 28 2009 11:39 AM
Jerry from NY, NY

why this sob stories about illegals, they would be deported in other countries. do local people matter any more or who ever decides come here illegally will tell us what to do?
try to come to other country and say well I want citizenship here because I decided so.

Apr. 28 2009 11:39 AM
Peg from Mt. Tabor, NJ

What are the paternity laws in Uraguay? I have an unmarried friend who came to the US with her daughter. She does not have legal status here, and is worried that she may never get it, since the her daughter's biological father in Uraguay says he has a legal claim on the daughter, and will not release that claim. What's with that??

Apr. 28 2009 11:30 AM

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