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Friday, March 27, 2009

Americans make more than 43 billion customer service calls each year. To find out what’s really going on at the other end of the line, Emily Yellin, author of the new book, Your Call Is (Not That) Important to Us, traveled the world to investigate the multi-billion dollar customer service industry. Plus, an update from Washington DC; and ghetto film school.

Guests:

Emily Yellin

The Web of Washington

Susan Page, Washington bureau chief for USA Today, and Ed O'Keefe, Federal Eye columnist for washingtonpost.com, discuss the latest from Washington, including the virtual town hall and budget negotiations.

Comments [13]

Hit the Reset Button

Kurt Andersen, novelist and host of PRI's Studio 360, wrote the cover article for this week's Time Magazine called "The End of Excess: Why This Crisis is Good for America", talks about the end of an era and a way forward.

Comments [8]

Garage Doors

Margot Tohn, author and publisher of Park It! NYC: Complete Guide to Parking Garages, offers inside info on where to park in Manhattan.

Comments [16]

Ghetto Film School

Joe Hall, president of the Ghetto Film School, a media training program for NYC youth, talks about the work that his organization does with Bronx teens. Alma Osorio, 17 years old and Nia Fields, 16 years old, are two of the people behind GFS latest production, Live, Joseph! ...

Comments [1]

Customer Service

Emily Yellin writes about the good, the bad and the fully automated in her new book Your Call Is (Not That) Important to Us: Customer Service and What It Reveals About Our World and Our Lives (Free Press, 2009).

Comments [33]

Rockefeller Reform

There's an agreement in Albany to reform the Rockefeller Drug Laws. WNYC reporter, Elaine Rivera, gives an update on the latest.

Comments [1]

The Other Side of the Bracket

Rebecca Lobo, analyst and reporter for ESPN, talks about coverage of women's basketball.

Comments [2]

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