Streams

Cigarette Tax

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Harry B. Wallace, chief of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, on the controversy over untaxed cigarette sales on reservations and what it's like to be an Indian chief in Long Island.

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Harry B. Wallace
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Comments [9]

George D

It is unreal how many silly racial ,biggots there still are in the world.Clearly people like Mr. johnston are only trying to hurt people of color with such remarks.You say Mr Wallace is not honest abourt our History.What do you know of it? I dont care if you were a History prof at the biggest school on the planet. It is clear that you are a fool and one who thinks he knows our history better then us.It is people like you who have tryed these tactics since your families got off the boats. You should check your own families history and stop making comments about others.We have been here since the ice melted. Where was your family 10.000 years ago? The island you now live on was part of our peoples aswell and if you dont like us ,Which is clear to all , I invite you to return to you own home and leave us to our business.. have a good day

Jul. 20 2010 04:31 PM
John from east patchogue ny 11772

AS a silent chief of the Unkechaug tribe,they should check Harry Wallaces blood rights! tax evasion

Apr. 27 2009 01:37 PM
Jon P. from Hewitt, NJ

I absolutely love it and support Harry B. Wallace 100%. Stick it to the white man like we have been sticking to them since the pilgrim days!!!!

Mar. 18 2009 03:52 PM
Scott_A from Astoria

If I bought a blanket, or a chair on their reservation, would I have to pay tax?

Could I only use that chair while I was on their reservation?

I think there's an obvious answer to those questions, which should extend to cigarettes.

Separately from that, we should have a conversation about anybody who sets up a business to profit from the sale of an addictive product that actively harms it's consumers.

Mar. 18 2009 11:02 AM
Richard Johnston from Manhattan Upper West Side

Harry Wallace guy knows he isn't fooling anybody. The crap about their 1038 years of ceremonies is an offensive misuse of history. Not wanting to accept Medicaid is disingenuous. He says the residents of his reservation are not responsible for the "problem" resulting from the increase of tobacco taxes in New York State, which has nothing to do with the fact that these people are helping damage the health of residents of New York and are undermining the state's revenue. They give Indians a bad name and ought to be ashamed of themselves for carrying on this charade.

Mar. 18 2009 11:01 AM
JOHN

I can't believe this. Why is valuable time being wasted on an issue that is nonsensical.
Why is the City going after the Unkechaug Indian Nation and yet not going after the cigarette smugglers from the south where cigarettes are dirt cheap. In that case NYC should go after states like VA, WV, SC etc.
LEAVE THE INDIAN NATIONS ALONE, HAVEN'T WE DONE ENOUGH SHAMEFUL DAMAGE TO THE NATIVE AMERICANS.

Mar. 18 2009 10:58 AM
John Huntington from Brooklyn

If you're wondering where this is:
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Unkechaug+Indian+Nation&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&ie=UTF8&hl=en&ll=40.786098,-72.835536&spn=0.02385,0.072098&z=15&iwloc=B

Mar. 18 2009 10:56 AM
Darius from Prospect Heights

US law has never been fair to Indian tribes so why would it start now?

Mar. 18 2009 10:55 AM
Robert

This guy's ridiculous. Chief Harry Wallace might want to think of another way to preserve his native culture than by selling his people massive amounts of cigarettes.

Mar. 18 2009 10:52 AM

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