Streams

Endangered Pubs

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Bill Barich, author of A Pint of Plain: Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub, explains that, while “Irish Pubs” continue to open around the world, fewer and fewer can actually be found in Ireland.

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Bill Barich
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Comments [11]

gaetano catelli from manhattan

myself, i go to South's on Church Street between Franklin and White.

btw, fwiw, i love to listen to "Danny Boy" -- and i don't care who minds.

Mar. 19 2009 02:14 AM
nitpicker from Manhattan

Not to be trivial, but did the guest say "irregardless" toward the end?

Mar. 17 2009 12:03 PM
the truth from Atlanta/New York

Black American with an Irish surname. I do not go to the pubs but, I get invitations by mail every year...wonder how they are coming up with the sort for that mailing list? Things that make you go hmmmmm.....

Mar. 17 2009 11:51 AM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

Pubs are our most democratic institutions. Everyone comes in on an equal footing.

Mar. 17 2009 11:48 AM
Mickey Bitsko from Downtown Manhattan

Is your guest acquainted with the 18th or 19th century architect, Nixon, who designed a number of rural pubs and inns, including a lovely one in the western town of Cong? Very hard to find information on him.

Slainte everyone! Now get your heathen selves to church!

Mar. 17 2009 11:44 AM
James B from NYC

Yeah, & we ain't growing wheat & potatos in the Bronx anymore either...So?

Since when have so many 'progressives' become so wedded to what was or has always been? So the pubs are no longer family owned & the small rural communities have been 'surburbanized' & folks are spending more time online rather than drinkin to excess every night in the local pub - what's the BIG deal here?

Mar. 17 2009 11:43 AM
delmore from queens

bill barich ought to move to woodside. donovan's would be his new home.

Mar. 17 2009 11:34 AM
James B from NYC

Can we talk about alcoholism & the pain it imposes on so many, particularly sp many young people? Or is that out of order?

Mar. 17 2009 11:11 AM
Phil from NYC

Great comment above! I'm a Black American which possibly makes me just that much more loathsome of stereotypes. Thats said, I find it very hard to stomach the; "they/ we're Irish! That's what they/ we do! Drink, get drunk, etc". Its ridiculous. I have alot friends from Irish decent - who unfortunately seem to want to perpetuate this nonsense. What I do find is most have never been to Ireland. So wht they associate Ireland w/ is unfortunately the shallow part. I have been to Ireland a few times. I have had very culturally rich experiences each time - a very small portion of which had ANYTHING to do with a pub or drinking for that matter and I had a great time! - Éire go Brách

Mar. 17 2009 10:27 AM
Kate

I am American, but I used to live in England, and people would often ask me what part of Ireland I was from when they heard me speak. Funny.

Mar. 17 2009 10:25 AM
Randolph from Dublin

In Ireland we're fed up being told our 'culture' is somehow endangered because we'd rather not frequent local versions of those awful "Oirish" bars you find in Boston and New York. Why Americans can't get it into their heads that Ireland is a modern progressive European country – nothing more, nothing less – is deeply mystifying. It's almost as if you would rather we were living some sort of pre-20th century simpleton agrarian existence. Irish stereotypes perpetuated in the US and British media aren't simply a few decades of date – they're 150 years out of date. Incidentally no self respecting Irish person would dream of drinking in Temple Bar - it's the land of the boozed-up British stag party. I had to pass through there last night. It was full of drunks alright. None of them were actually Irish. Btw...Ask your guest if he's been to Anseo, Dice Bar, The South William or The Bernard Shaw in Dublin. These are among of the buzziest spots in the city - the sort of places were Irish people actually hang out. if he hasn't, then he's not really qualified to talk about Irish bar culture.

Mar. 17 2009 09:20 AM

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