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Comedian Trevor Noah on "Born a Crime"

Thursday, June 13, 2013

South African comedian Trevor Noah discusses his new off-Broadway solo show, “Born a Crime,” about being born mixed-race under Apartheid in South Africa. It which runs Wednesday through Saturday through June 29 at Culture Project. His Showtime special premieres July 6 at midnight.

Guests:

Trevor Noah
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Comments [7]

Mary

Actually, not only kids with 'mixed-race' parents but all kids. We fill out forms for them all the time where we need to bucket them in some group.

Jun. 13 2013 06:22 PM
fuva from harlemworld

Of course they shouldn't be made to. Do you think 'mixed-race' people who identify as black are made to?

Jun. 13 2013 03:58 PM
Mary

Kids with parents of different skin color should not be made to choose one way or another.

Jun. 13 2013 02:00 PM
fuva from harlemworld

Consider, Mary, that black people did not start this business of race designation and terror based on it...Through the years, we have embraced blackness to expose and confront white supremacism, and this is still required.

Jun. 13 2013 01:03 PM
Toussaint from NYC

To Mary: The police and the tea party are not confused about those people.

Jun. 13 2013 12:57 PM
Mary

I'm a bit confused about black people with one white parent who decide that they are black. It's as if the white parent had nothing to do with their life.

Jun. 13 2013 12:55 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Some of Mr. Noah's stories remind me of other things: his mother's posing as his hired caretaker makes me think of Moses' mother's being hired as his wet nurse, & the pencil test sounds like the paper bag test in New Orleans decades ago, in which a black person's status depended on having a skin shade darker or lighter than a paper bag.

Jun. 13 2013 12:54 PM

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