Streams

Legal Weed: Economics

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Marijuana (Federacion de Asociaciones Cannabicas/flickr)

A May series on marijuana continues with the economics of the drug. Mark Kleiman professor of public policy at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, marijuana legalization consultant for Washington State, and co-author of Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know  [Oxford University Press], talks about the supply and demand side of legalizing marijuana, including what it means for geopolitics and patents and taxes.

 

Guests:

Mark Kleiman
News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [6]

thatgirl from manhattan

Nancy from Manhattan - Wake up! The "drug war" was lost long ago. The U.S. is, officially, more an addict of Rx drugs, using them more recreationally than anything like marijuana--and we pay for all that use, as well!

Ask any average college student these days about the top drugs used on campus, dispensed by dealers; Adderall, Oxycontin top the list.

May. 23 2013 04:02 PM
jf from TRUTHLAND

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mbupe471Fy1qarbuho1_1280.jpg

May. 23 2013 10:58 AM
Nancy from Manhattan

Any report on the costs/benefits of legal marijuana that doesn't figure in the current cost of the "drug war" is worthless.

May. 23 2013 10:57 AM
jf from REALITY

It helps public health. IT IS NOT A COST. IT IS A BENEFIT. EXPONENTIALLY.

May. 23 2013 10:56 AM
fuva from harlemworld

Will 'chemical content' be monitored and regulated? Maybe off-topic...

May. 23 2013 10:56 AM
fuva from harlemworld

Will 'chemical content' be monitored and regulated? Maybe off-topic...

May. 23 2013 10:56 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.