Streams

The Governor's Budget

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Bob Hardt, executive producer and political director, New York 1 and Daily News Albany bureau chief Ken Lovett react to excerpts from Gov. Paterson's budget address.

Guests:

Bob Hardt and Ken Lovett
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Comments [20]

Jackie

In regards to the possible prison closings, perhaps we should rethink this. States like California have a problem with overcrowded prisons. Couldn’t we take on some of their inmates at cost or for profit? We keep upstate workers employed and other states won’t have the burden of building more prisons.

Dec. 16 2008 05:21 PM
susan from bklyn.

Jimmy Carter foresaw difficult times in giving the "Malaise" speech if the US did not get realistic about consumption and expectations. America did not want to hear this and a Reagan/ Bush-- "we're promising you the world because we deserve..."-- band-aid was put on a wound, exasperated by entitlement and greed and stupidity... we love more for nothing.
I do not claim to be able to read in between the lines of political speak but since Patterson assumed office, I have appreciated his no-nonsense stances from right-off-the-bat coming clean about his flaws and indiscretions to this current budget proposal, popularity is not usually achieved by telling the truth but it is the right thing to do.

Dec. 16 2008 12:42 PM
Linda from Manhattan

I'm sure Florida loves our tax policies. As we force more families and fixed income residents down there at our expense due to our ridiculous levels of income and property taxes. Er pay their pensions and send them to another state... smart.

Dec. 16 2008 12:19 PM
Jeffrey Slott from East Elmhurst

The New York governor refuses to increases taxes for the rich but everyone else will have to pay more money anyway for the services they need like education, health care, etc. So in a sense it's a tax on everyone but the wealthy. Typical American politics...

Dec. 16 2008 12:16 PM
Laura

Budget cuts to the NY prison system started in the summer when the government decided to close working farms in the system as of March '09. Prison farm programs help instill a sense of stewardship in inmates while allowing them to work toward something that is tangible, self-sufficient, and sustainable.
My question is: which dairy companies are getting the contracts to supply prisons with dairy and other goods/services when they have to outsource?

Dec. 16 2008 12:02 PM
Matt from Brooklyn

If Cuny tuition is going to rise why not increase it up to 3000 per semester and give the students better services such as clean restrooms( they are disgusting), better tutoring and smaller classes (had classes at Baruch with 200+ students).
It could employ more people and provide a better educational experience for students for a price still cheaper than about any other higher education in the country.

Dec. 16 2008 12:02 PM
Zach from Brooklyn

New York has somewhat high property taxes, but especially in the NYC, the rates are relatively low compared to other places. States without income taxes have really high property and sales taxes (Texas and Florida).

In the case of Chicago, the taxes may be lower, but you get what you pay for. It has a decrepit metro system that makes NYC's look like a modern marvel.

I'm sure there is stuff to cut from the budget, which the governor is proposing to do. But you just can't cut that much, especially since most of the budget is consumed by education and medicare spending.

As to that caller complaining about trees, first off its mostly private money that is going towards the MillionTrees program. If he had bothered to take the subway and see the adds he'd know. Plus street trees help reduce asthma and other respitory illnesses (reducing health care costs!) and help regulate the temperature in the city (saving on heating and cooling costs) also while reducing stormwater runoff, which currently costs the city millions in fines from the EPA.

Dec. 16 2008 12:01 PM
Leo from Queens


Can Governor Patterson request that state legislators and other agency chiefs take a 20% salary cut? - The Legislature was irresponsible and complicit with Governor Pataki in saddling the state government with huge debts that is now taking a huge amount of our revenues - Can't we imposes a $10M tax on Mr. Pataki and the wealth he accumulated while in office? - It's not much, but it will set a great precedent on accountability

Dec. 16 2008 12:01 PM
Leo from Queens

Eliott was Right on!!. At least ONE other person in this city who sees the Mayor's $400 Tax rebate for what it is - A SCAM - An inefficient SCAM used to MANIPULATE voters in the City - The mayor and the Citi Council president are cynical and insulting to intelligent taxpayers

Dec. 16 2008 11:58 AM
hjs from 11211

more trees please!

Dec. 16 2008 11:56 AM
SteverR from Manhattan

Need personnel cuts. That's the only way to bring down the budget in meaningful ways.

Dec. 16 2008 11:56 AM
Robert from NYC

I think it is a million trees and i think it was some rock star or group and the mayor and not David Rockefeller. But I could be wrong, I have been before, yes even I am wrong sometimes, perfect as I am.

Dec. 16 2008 11:56 AM
O from Forest Hills

Are professors from CUNY and Suny going to be cut?

Dec. 16 2008 11:56 AM
Linda from Manhattan

RH, the problem is the rich are far more mobile than you or I. They can simply move their primary residence elsewhere and keep their Manhattan apartment and save a large amount on income taxes. You and I cannot. I don't think we want to make the tax burden in this state even more onerous which will intern leave the burden to the rest of us.

Dec. 16 2008 11:56 AM
LM from New York

Brian questioned if SUNY and CUNY tution will be increased.

While I don't know amount CUNY, I can tell you that SUNY tuition has ALLREADY been increased from last month and the tuition increase has already been implemented for the January 2009 (Spring 2009) semester.

I would hope Gov. Patterson would punish students more by adding another increase on top of that as that would REALLY take some hutzpah!!

Dec. 16 2008 11:51 AM
RH from Brooklyn

I just do not get (intellectually) the allergy to an income tax on the wealthy. Does anyone genuinely believe that people will give up their Upper East Side town houses or condos if they have to pay 1.1% or 0.95% more on their income? It's ok to throw out numbers like 23% or 8% increases on subway fares alone, but heaven forfend the wealthy give up an entree at a high-end restaurant!

I do give him huge credit for talking about increases in the basic welfare grant.

Dec. 16 2008 11:51 AM
Linda from Manhattan

Property taxes in this state are out of control. People cannot simply cut back on this type of tax, they are forced out of their homes. This is ridiculous. Why can State and City cut their employment costs which is the majority of the problem? Why should I be forced to leave my home?

Dec. 16 2008 11:47 AM
Pilar from Brooklyn

Someone gets it, unlike the guests. People are leaving this state in large numbers. The costs are too high. We cannot eat more taxes or tax more businesses away. The size of the state and city governments must be reduced severely.

Even other large cities like Chicago have a combined city/state tax rate of 3% unlike NYC that has a combined rate of 12%. What on earth to we get for that differential? And NYC also took in far more money from the financial, real estate and tourism industries than Chicago.

So please don't tell me that we don't have an ability to cut our way out of this problem with no additional tax burdens on people of this state who are quickly falling into dire financial shape. The residents of this state can no longer look the other way at all the waste, we simply cant afford to.

Dec. 16 2008 11:44 AM
O from Forest Hills

Won't people leave the state if things are too expensive and we will lose companies and revenue that way?

Dec. 16 2008 11:37 AM
O from Forest Hills

Good speech.

At least someone gets it.

Dec. 16 2008 11:34 AM

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