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Republican Leader: Governor Cuomo's Abortion Bill Not Coming to the Floor

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

A key component of Governor Cuomo's 20-13 agenda appears in jeopardy. The governor said Wednesday he does not have enough votes in the state senate to bring an abortion bill he has championed to the floor.

New York State Senate Republican Leader Dean Skelos says a bill that would codify the abortion rights protections of the Roe vs. Wade decision under state law decision won’t be coming up for a vote in the State Senate. 

“We’re not going to put in on the floor,” Skelos said. “In my opinion and the opinion of my conference, that bill is not moving.” 

Senator Skelos says abortion rights are not in jeopardy, so there's no need. Governor Cuomo concedes he does not currently have the right formula for a bill that would garner enough votes in the Senate.

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“We do not yet have language for a bill where we have identified enough votes with certainty that it would pass,” Cuomo said. 

Around 30 Democrats in the Senate who would likely vote for a version of the reproductive health act, but 32 votes are needed to pass legislation. 

The governor said he is working with a coalition of women’s groups to come up with legislation that could be agreeable to a handful of moderate Senate Republicans,who could then join with the Democrats to vote yes.

State Senate Republican Leader Dean Skelos says a bill that would codify put in state law the abortion rights protections in the Roe v Wade decision won’t be coming up for a vote in the State Senate. 
“We’re not going to put in on the floor,” Skelos said. “In my opinion and the opinion of my conference, that bill is not moving.” 
Senator Skelos says abortion rights are not in jeopardy, so there's no need. Governor Cuomo concedes he does not currently have the right formula for a bill that would garner enough votes in the Senate. 
“We do not yet have language for a bill where we have identified enough votes with certainty that it would pass,” Cuomo said. 
Around 30 Democrats in the Senate who would likely vote for a version of the reproductive health act, but 32 votes are needed to pass legislation. 
Cuomo's working with a coalition of women’s groups to come up with legislation that could be agreeable to a handful of moderate Senate Republicans, who could then join with the Democrats to vote y

 

 

Editors:

Julianne Welby

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Comments [1]

Mike RS

More delay Here's the reality... Under Cuomo NY has experienced the demise of 39,453 NY state businesses last year, Cuomo is raiding $1.75 billion from the reserves of the already over budget State Insurance Fund (SIF). Cuomo can not even hold on to his democratic majority which is in the middle of a corruption scandal with “show-me-the-money culture” and “pay-to-play politics” throughout Albany. Cuomo has disenfranchised the Northern and Western part of New York with his SAFE Act. Cuomo is afraid to make a decision, either way with respect to fracking, gambling or abortions. No matter what your position is, Cuomo is leaving New Yorkers with no resolution to these issues or the ability to move forward. New York has the highest taxes in the nation, is the most indebted state, with 33 percent of income dedicated to borrowing. It is ranked as the least "business-friendly" state in the country and if that were not bad enough NY has the distinction of being the least free state in the union and is called the “Nanny State” with politicians legislating what we eat and drink. Municipal governments from Nassau County to Yonkers to Syracuse are teetering. And during Mr. Cuomo’s time in office, unemployment has risen above the national average. 9% of the state’s 2000 population left for another state between 2000 and 2011 — the highest such figure in the nation, see the study by George Mason's

May. 02 2013 08:34 AM

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