Bangladesh Building Collapse Raises Questions About Fashion Supply Chain

Dozens of laborers killed in the collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh last week were laid to rest Wednesday in a mass funeral.

The disaster has cost more than 400 lives and is raising fresh questions about working conditions for the people who make the clothes we wear.

Michael Londrigan, dean of academic affairs at LIM College, said the disaster could be a turning point for fashion labels that rely on the global supply chain.

Dozens of laborers killed in the collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh last week were laid to rest today in a mass funeral. The disaster has cost more than 400 lives....and is raising new questions about working conditions for the people who make the clothes we wear. 
Michael Londrigan is dean of academic affairs at L-I-M College, a fashion business school on Manhattan's east side. He's also worked for JC Penney and Cotton Incorporated. Welcome to WNYC.

"I'm looking at this as the companies here in the U.S. and in Europe putting more pressure on the governments. This fellow who was building this building had permission to build a five-story building. He added three stories illegally. Someone had to know about that," Londrigan said.

To hear a full interview with Michael Londrigan, click the audio above.