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Bangladesh Building Collapse Raises Questions About Fashion Supply Chain

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

Dozens of laborers killed in the collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh last week were laid to rest Wednesday in a mass funeral.

The disaster has cost more than 400 lives and is raising fresh questions about working conditions for the people who make the clothes we wear.

Michael Londrigan, dean of academic affairs at LIM College, said the disaster could be a turning point for fashion labels that rely on the global supply chain.

Dozens of laborers killed in the collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh last week were laid to rest today in a mass funeral. The disaster has cost more than 400 lives....and is raising new questions about working conditions for the people who make the clothes we wear. 
Michael Londrigan is dean of academic affairs at L-I-M College, a fashion business school on Manhattan's east side. He's also worked for JC Penney and Cotton Incorporated. Welcome to WNYC.

"I'm looking at this as the companies here in the U.S. and in Europe putting more pressure on the governments. This fellow who was building this building had permission to build a five-story building. He added three stories illegally. Someone had to know about that," Londrigan said.

To hear a full interview with Michael Londrigan, click the audio above.

Guests:

Michael Londrigan

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Amy Eddings

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Comments [1]

Peter from USA

Did Amy structurally inspect the building she works in? Did she hire a civil engineer to inspect the building her child is in day care in. Unfair questions reflecting her bias and assumptions that "big bad name brand firms" are doing some thing wrong.

Amy's structure and framing of the wage issue reflects the same intense bias. Did Amy or any of her staff/team check to see what the average monthly wage in Bangladesh is? Or maybe put the $38/month into the context of the cost of living there?

I find Amy's raw bias upsetting and not in keeping with any professional standard of impartiality or desire to tell the who story.

The story should have been about the crook who built 3 extra floor onto his building or maybe the corruption in the Gov't that allows this to happen. Let's put the blame where it belongs, not on the easy target.

May. 02 2013 02:51 PM

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