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Inside Scientology, Looking at David Foster Wallace, Mary Pickford on Film, Temple Grandin on Autism Science

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

On today’s show: We’re re-airing a conversation about the inner workings of the Church of Scientology with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright and a conversation with D. T. Max on how David Foster Wallace has become one of the most influential writers of his generation. Then we’ll take a look at Mary Pickford with film historian Christel Schmidt and piano accompanist Ben Model. And Temple Grandin talks about the latest scientific research about autism and how our understanding of the autism spectrum has grown.

Inside Scientology

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright descirbes the inner workings of the Church of Scientology. His book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and Prison of Belief is based on more than 200 personal interviews with current and former Scientologists

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The Life and Work of David Foster Wallace

D. T. Max talks about his biography of David Foster Wallace, one of the most influential writers of his generation. In Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, Max charts Wallace’s battle to succeed as a novelist as he fights off depression and addiction to emerge with his masterpiece, Infinite Jest. Since his death by suicide at the age of forty-six in 2008, Wallace has become a symbol of sincerity and honesty in an inauthentic age.

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Mary Pickford: Queen of the Movies

Christel Schmidt talks about Mary Pickford, cinema's first great star, along with Ben Model, piano accompanist. Schmidt is editor of Mary Pickford: Queen of the Movies, a collection of essays by film historians that sheds new light on this icon's incredible life and legacy. Pickford is revealed as a gifted actress, a philanthropist, and a savvy industry leader who fought for creative control of her films and ultimately became her own producer.

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Temple Grandin on The Autistic Brain

Temple Grandin talks about the latest autism science. When she was born in 1947, autism had only just been named. Today, one in 88 children diagnosed on the spectrum, and autism studies have moved from the realm of psychology to neurology and genetics, and there is far more hope today than ever before thanks to groundbreaking new research into causes and treatments. Her book The Autistic Brain, brings her singular perspective to an exploration of innovative theories of what causes autism and how we can diagnose and best treat it.

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