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Election Lawyers on Alert

Monday, November 03, 2008

Richard Hasen, law professor at Loyola Law School who writes the Election Law Blog, talks about legal issues that may crop up on Election Day.

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Richard Hasen
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Comments [6]

John Brooks from Astoria,NY

I have lived in the US for 25 years and have been eligible for citizenship for 11 years. In that time, I have watched one great president suffer impeachment on absurd grounds and another president serve two terms despite never having been elected. The only way Barack Obama cannot win this election is if it is stolen like the elections in 2000 and 2004. I want to be a part of this election, but I want to mean it when I'm sworn in as a citizen; I want to take that oath seriously. If Barack Obama both wins the election as Gore and Kerry did, and then BECOMES president, as they did not; if Americans defend their sacred democratic process; if America elects someone who will make my oath to this country legitimate, then I will be very, very excited tomorrow morning to begin that paperwork, to become a citizen of a country that is willing to elect a man of the stature, dignity, and integrity of Barack Obama. I've never been more excited, frankly.

Nov. 04 2008 10:18 AM
Gus Solomons from NYC

Voting for me today was frustrating. I was exhilarated that at 5:50am I was the 40th person in line. But when I got to the table, my name was not in the roll book. I have voted every four years since 1961, and I have lived at the same address since 1972. I had to fill out a provisional ballot, rather than using a machine. How can I insure that this never happens again?
Gus

Nov. 04 2008 10:14 AM
Dave Kliman from Glen Cove, NY

I am very concerned about these lines. this is voter disenfranchisement in action. What is causing the lines? lack of election workers. Republicans are playing dirty tricks, and there should be criminal penalties for these tricks.

Rachel Maddow had an excellent piece on the lines, http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26315908/#27508339 as Rick Hasen mentioned.

Nov. 03 2008 10:42 AM
Karen from Manhattan

The McCain campaign has been recruiting litigators -- for pay, not on a volunteer basis -- to go into Court tomorrow on behalf of McCain. This suggests to me that the campaign expects to challenge votes and vote results, and also to have to defend against challenges that may result from Republican vote obstruction efforts.

Nov. 03 2008 10:41 AM
jen from soho

if a machine breaks down, are the votes already cast lost?

Nov. 03 2008 10:40 AM
Lilym from NJ

I am voting for the first time!
I am so excited and more nervous than both candidates together.
Some questions: I live in NJ. If you look at the sample ballot in the column on the left, "Office Title" says "Presidental Electors for (Vote for 1 slate), below "US Senate for 6 years (vote for 1), and below "vote for 1" "vote for 1" etc.
NOW, in the next column says "Republican Column 1" and next to it "Democratic Column 2".

That "1" in first column is little bit confusing and maybe even subliminal. For someone who doesn't speak English well or rushes through voting or is nervous, it could "mean" to vote FOR REPUBLICAN COLUMN 1. It is strange that nobody thought of writing 1 in letters, as business letter writing rules require. It could also say "Vote for one person, or one slate". Am I the only one who noticed this? Maybe because I am a foreigner?
Let's don't even talk about trying to understand those "Public Questions to be Voted Upon". I can read it 10 times over and not understand the thing. First question is ONE sentence 14 lines long!!!
Also, couple of my friends who passed their citizenship test months ago will become citizens only after elections (I became citizen immediatelly after the test). This happened in 2000 and 2004 to people I know. Is this regular thing when Republicans are in power, knowing that immigrants mostly vote Democrat?
Thanks for your answers.

Nov. 02 2008 04:53 PM

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