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NYPD to Study Airborne Chemical Attacks

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

MTA subway platform (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

The NYPD and a national laboratory will be studying how chemical weapons could spread in the air and throughout the subway system this summer in what is the first study of its kind in such a large urban environment.

Researchers with the Brookhaven National Laboratory will release non-toxic, odorless gas in that mimics how chemical, biological and radiological weapons would disperse. About 200 sampling devices will be used to detect to the gas.

"We want to be able to determine how toxic material can flow through the transit system, it's one of the concerns that we've had for a while and how it flows on the streets of our city," Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said in a statement.

The tests will begin in July in all five boroughs in 21 subway stations. It is not expected to have an impact on commuting or other activity, police say.

Boston and Washington have conducted similar tests, but this will be the largest.

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Comments [3]

The Inventor

Old news.

These studies have been done not only in NYC, but in other subway systems around the world. The result: subways are great places for toxic chemicals to be spread. The wakes of air easily transport them throughout the system.

Apr. 25 2013 02:53 PM
Damon F

Apparently, they are using perfluorocarbon gas, a gas so "harmless" that Canada has it listed under Sched 1 of controlled substances due to it constituting a danger to human life or health:

"PFCs were added to Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999 in November2005 in order to enable the Government the use of a variety of preventive or control actions.... It must be determined that a substance is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that:

(a) have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity;.

(b) constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends; or.

(c) constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Based on an analysis of the existing science, most notably documented in the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR), there is sufficient evidence to conclude that, perfluorocarbons (PFCs) constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends".

So much for a "harmless" gas!

Apr. 24 2013 07:36 PM
Apu Plectic from NYC

It's taken THIS long to study?!!! The attack in Tokyo was almost 20 years ago. 9/11 was 12 years ago. Oh yeah, they're right on top of it! Nanny Bloomberg is too busy worrying about Big Gulps and salt and green lighting his real estate developer cronies. Unbelievable.

Apr. 24 2013 06:10 PM

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