Streams

Chuck Close: Photo Maquettes

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Artist Chuck Close discusses his work and the photographs he works from to make his large-scale portraits. There’s an exhibition of his photographs, “Chuck Close: Photo Maquettes” is on view Eykyn Maclean Gallery.

Chuck Close Study for Keith
© 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery
Chuck Close. From Study for "Keith/Four times", 1975, four gelatin silver prints with ink, graphite, and tape, mounted to foamcore

Each image; 19 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, each mounted; 24 1/8 x 19 5/8 inches, signed, titled, and dated recto in pencil on each, print, unique. © 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery

Chuck Close Study for Keith
© 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery
Chuck Close. From Study for "Keith/Four times", 1975, four gelatin silver prints with ink, graphite, and tape, mounted to foamcore

Each image; 19 7/8 x 15 5/8 inches, each mounted; 24 1/8 x 19 5/8 inches, signed, titled, and dated recto in pencil on each, print, unique. © 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery

Chuck Close Phyllis
© 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery
Chuck Close. Phyllis/maquette, 1981, gelatin silver print with graphite and ink mounted to board

Image; 20 x 16 inches, mounted; 30 x 20 inches, signed, titled, and dated recto in pencil, "maquette for Phyllis, 1984, pulp paper collage on canvas 92 x 72" inscribed verso in pencil, unique. © 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery

Chuck Close Self-Portrait 1975
© 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery
Chuck Close. Self-Portrait/maquette, 1975, b&w Polaroid, masking tape, ink, and acetate, mounted on foamcore

Image; 4 1/2 x 3 1/8 inches, board; 6 3/8 x 4 7/8 inches, unique, Private collection. © 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery

Chuck Close Self-Portrait 2011
© 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery
Chuck Close. Self-Portrait II/maquette, 2011, color Polaroid with ink, red-colored dot adhesive, and tape mounted to foamcore

Image; 24 x 20 inches, mounted approx.; 38 x 26 inches (irregular), signed, titled, and dated recto in ink, unique. © 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery

Chuck Close Cecily
© 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery
Chuck Close. Cecily/maquette, 2000, black and white Polaroid with ink and tape mounted to foamcore

Image; 24 x 20 inches, mounted; 39 7/8 x 29 7/8 inches, signed, titled, and dated recto in ink, annotated "33397" verso in ink on tape, unique. © 2013 Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery

Guests:

Chuck Close

Comments [3]

oscar from ny

To the ppl below me…mr close payd his due in 88 so hr had the right away for any artwork he likes...the grids are awesome but tracing is the new mixed with computer grafix you can hdmi almost everything and if your skilled, every fiber of everything in this universe can be applied to make a work work..

Apr. 25 2013 01:41 PM
Jf from Rigged reality

Thats nice that,he can make bank accounts, by painting the equivalent of a photoshop effect but what about the other 100000000 artists that cant make bank accounts because they make art with substance?

Apr. 25 2013 01:13 PM
art525 from Park Slope

I have heard Mr Close speak numerous times and always found him to be quite intelligent and insightful. But that first exchange here in this interview would lead one to believe otherwise. First of all despite his labeling his studies as maquettes and seeming to struggle with what they are, as if he has stumbled on smething new, it is the oldest trick in the book to take photos and grid them to scale them up. And of course traditionally artists like Michelangelo used the same process using their own drawings rather than photos. And then he said that the Impressionists did drawings and brought them back to the studio to work from. While that might occasionally have been true in general the whole concept of the Imressionists was to paint from life, from the source, in plein air. Monet's whole approach was to try to see deeper and deeper and search for what the real color was. He was working in oppostion to those artist who worked in the studio and relied on conventions for their color. He often claimed that he didn't work in the studio at all though we know that that isn't true. But his real passion, his real MO was to paint from life.

Apr. 25 2013 12:54 PM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.