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Thousands Sign Up for New York City Bike Share in First Hours of Registration

Monday, April 15, 2013 - 05:05 PM

NYC Deputy Mayor Howard Wolfson (left) and NYC Transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan hold an oversized replica of a bike share key-card. NYC Deputy Mayor Howard Wolfson (left) and NYC Transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan hold an oversized replica of a bike share key-card. ((photo by Jim O'Grady))

UPDATED. Registration for New York's bike share system officially opened at 11 am Monday, and by 3 pm, some 2500 people had signed up. By 3:30 pm Tuesday, 5000 people had purchased $103 annual memberships, according to DOT spokesman Scott Gastel.

The memberships allow riders to use any bike for up to 45 minutes with no additional charge.

(For information on how to sign up and where to find maps, click on our related post here.)

By comparison, about 2,000 people signed up in the entire month before Washington DC's bike share launched in August 2010 according to Chris Holben, who runs the bike share program for the District DOT. Washington currently has the largest bike share system in the United States.

Since Capital Bikeshare's launch, about 500-1,000 people have signed up per month, according to a cool system data chart made available by DDOT. The system has 22,000 annual members.

Washington D.C.'s busiest month ever for memberships was April 2011, when the system offered a Living Social promotion for memberships. The offer brought in 5,500 memberships that month, outstripping predictions threefold.

But New York's Citibike registration could surpass that number on the second day of registration, if the trend holds.  That would blow it past its "founding membership" goal of 5000, which included certain perks, like discounts on helmets and a "founding member" key.

"The scale in New York is so different  it's hard to project what the numbers might be," Chris Holben, DDOT bike share director, told TN in a phone interview.  "New York's system is much bigger than anything in the U.S. -- and it's  a new form of public transportation.  "

The memberships allow riders to use any bike for up to 45 minutes with no additional charge.

(For information on how to sign up and where to find maps, click on our related post here.)

By comparison, about 2,000 people signed up in the entire month before Washington DC's bike share launched in August 2010 according to Chris Holben, who runs the bike share program for the District DOT. Washington currently has the largest bike share system in the United States.

Since Capital Bikeshare's launch, about 500-1,000 people have signed up per month, according to a cool system data chart made available by DDOT. The system has 22,000 annual members.

Washington D.C.'s busiest month ever for memberships was April 2011, when the system offered a Living Social promotion for memberships. The offer brought in 5,500 memberships that month, outstripping predictions threefold.

But New York's Citibike registration could surpass that number on the second day of registration, if the trend holds. That would blow it past its "founding membership" goal of 5000, which included certain perks, like discounts on helmets and a "founding member" key.

"The scale in New York is so different it's hard to project what the numbers might be," Chris Holben, DDOT bike share director, told TN in a phone interview. "New York's system is much bigger than anything in the U.S. -- and it's a new form of public transportation. "

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