Streams

Controversial Atlantic Avenue "Coffins" Now Being Removed in Brooklyn

Tuesday, July 24, 2012 - 11:18 AM

(photo by Andrea Bernstein)

(UPDATED WITH MTA INFORMATION) The imposing concrete bollards surrounding Brooklyn's Atlantic Terminal station are coming down.

The so-called "coffins" appeared without warning in 2010, when the new terminal was opened. "More Extreme Than NYPD Counterterror Guidelines" mocked a Streetsblog headline. Urban planners decried the bollards as pedestrian-unfriendly and a backwards model of city design.

The Long Island Rail Road and nine subway lines stop at the Atlantic Terminal station, which will serve the new Barclays Center arena when it opens in September.

New York's MTA cited unspecified security concerns in installing what the Brooklyn Paper called "sarcophagi."

Workers there say the bollards will be replaced with "something else."

A spokesman for the MTA said that "something else" is new, smaller bollards. The work is part of a $3.5 million security upgrade at the subway terminal.

Deconstruction: bollards being removed in downtown Brooklyn (photo by Andrea Bernstein)

 

(photo by Andrea Bernstein)

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Comments [3]

Matthias

Atlantic Terminal is actually the LIRR terminal, not a subway terminal.

The adjacent subway station is called Atlantic Av.

Jul. 26 2012 08:48 AM
Kurt

Now it'd be great if they opened the blinds so we could see in and out of the windows.

Jul. 24 2012 02:51 PM
Eric McClure

Not to be nitpicky, but NoLandGrab.org broke the news of the massive bollards in December 2009, and referred to them as Sarcophagi well before the Brooklyn Paper did:

http://www.nolandgrab.org/archives/2009/12/tomb_of_the_unk.html

http://www.nolandgrab.org/archives/2011/08/bollard_backtra.html

Jul. 24 2012 11:29 AM

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