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TN MOVING STORIES: Drilling Dollars, Autonomous Car Laws, Subway Recovery

Friday, March 29, 2013 - 08:21 AM

Top Stories on TN

Fung Wah Investigation Leads to 2nd, More Shocking Shut Down Order, Terrifying Quotes (link)
Poll: Fewer Than Half of Californians Support High-Speed Rail (link)
Dozens in Congress Press for Nat’l Bike and Pedestrian Safety Goals, Measurement (link)
With Plans Drawn, Maryland’s Purple Line Scares Some Business Owners (link)

Traffic in Detroit, Michigan sometime between 1915 and 1925 (Library of Congress http://wny.cc/ZGQYrk)

Linking new gas drilling and energy revenues to transportation funding could solve funding problems, or scuttle chances for a bipartisan transpo deal. (Politico)

A company wants to build a giant vertical moisture fueled wind turbine of sorts that would be America's talled structure and generate wind energy. (Marketplace)

82% of Americans want the nation to prepare for climate change (USA Today via Direct Transfer)

Photos from the NY MTA of the newly restored, old South Ferry subway station called back into service after Sandy damaged the new station. (MTA)

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A recent legal paper makes the case that existing laws don't prohibit automated vehicles. (Atlantic Cities)

But maybe not if you wear Google Glass. W. Va could ban drivers in West Virginia from using the new face computers. (Wired)

There's a kerfuffle over foreign drivers in Florida (Sentinel)

To see if State DOTs are living out pedestrian-friendly values, Tri-State Transportation Campaign looked at the headquarters facilities from space of three state DOTs and evaluated them for walking. (link)

It one solution to pollution buildings that eat smog like this pretty one in Mexico City? (link)

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