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BREAKING: The Undead? LaHood Says FL Governor Scott Asked for, Was Granted, Another Week on High Speed Rail

Friday, February 25, 2011 - 03:07 PM

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood Statement on High-Speed Rail in Florida

WASHINGTON – U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today issued the following statement on high-speed rail in Florida:

“This morning I met with Governor Rick Scott to discuss the high speed rail project that will create jobs and economic development for the entire state of Florida. He asked me for additional information about the state’s role in this project, the responsibilities of the Florida Department of Transportation, as well as how the state would be protected from liability. I have decided to give Governor Scott additional time to review the agreement crafted by local officials from Orlando, Tampa, Lakeland and Miami, and to consult with his staff at the state Department of Transportation. He has committed to making a final decision by the end of next week. I feel we owe it to the people of Florida, who have been working to bring high speed rail to their state for the last 20 years, to go the extra mile.”

Here's Senator Bill Nelson's comment:

"I am grateful the governor has agreed to receive the facts on how the state will have no financial responsibility in high-speed rail.  I’m especially grateful to Secretary [ Ray ] LaHood for giving Florida at least one more week before our money goes to another state.  Hopefully, this will be enough time for people of good intentions to put Florida’s interests first.  There is too much at stake for us not to try everything we can. ”

Scroll down in our blog to see how unhappy both LaHood , Nelson and others were yesterday.

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